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Cultural Objects Name Authority Online
3. Editorial Rules, continued
 

3

EDITORIAL RULES, CONTINUED

   

3.6

 

Depicted Subject, Iconography Authority

Included in this chapter



CONA ICONOGRAPHY AUTHORITY

   

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.1

 

 

General Depicted Subject (required)

 

 

 

3.6.3.1.1

 

 

Definition
Indexing terms that characterize in general terms what the work depicts or what is depicted in it. This subject analysis is the minimum required. It is recommended to also list specific subjects, if possible

      • Examples
      • advertising and commercial
        allegory
        animal
        apparel
        architecture
        botanical
        cartographic
        ceremonial object
        cityscape
        didactic and propaganda
        funerary art
        genre
        history and legend
        human figure
        interior architecture
        landscape
        literary theme
        machine
        military
        mixed motif
        nonrepresentational art
        object (utilitarian)
        performance
        portrait
        religion and mythology
        seascape
        still life

 

 

 

3.6.3.1.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.1.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.1.4

 

 

Discussion
The subject matter of a work of art (sometimes referred to as its content) is the narrative, iconographic, or non-objective meaning conveyed by an abstract or a figurative composition. It is what is depicted in and by a work of art. It also covers the function of an object or architecture that otherwise has no narrative content. CONA records terms to index a general subject and specific subjects. One term is required.

  • What are subjects?
    Subjects include things, places, activities, abstract shapes, decorations, stories, and events from literature, mythology, religion, or history. Philosophical, theoretical, symbolic, and allegorical themes and concepts may be subjects. Subjects of representational (figurative) works may be narrative, meaning that they tell a story or represent an episode in a story; they may be non-narrative, representing persons, animals, plants, buildings, or objects depicted in portraits, still lifes, landscapes, genre scenes, architectural drawings, allegories, and so on. Non-representational works also have subject matter, which may include a reference to abstract content, decoration, function, or implied themes or attributes. Subject should be recorded for all works and images, even those that have no narrative or figurative "subject matter" in the traditional sense. For abstract works, architecture, decorative arts, furniture, and other works with no narrative or figurative subject matter, their "content" may be the function of the works and important aspects of their form or composition.

  • Depicted subject answers to the question: What is the work "of" or "about"? Traditionally, what the work is about (often called about-ness) is defined as its iconographical, narrative, thematic, or symbolic meaning; what the work is of (often called of-ness) is defined as what would be seen in the work by an objective, non-expert, unknowledgeable viewer. Consideration of all these aspects of subject matter is important for retrieval. A methodical approach to subject analysis is recommended. Subject may be analyzed by posing successive questions Who?, What?, When?, and Where? Catalogers should also examine the work at various levels of specificity based loosely on theories of human perception and recognition of meaning in images described by the scholar Erwin Panofsky. Panofsky identified three primary levels of meaning in art: pre-iconographical description, expressional analysis or identification, and iconographical interpretation. Using a simplified and more practical application of this traditional art-historical approach can be helpful in indexing subjects for purposes of retrieval. The first level, description, refers to the generic elements depicted in or by the work (e.g., man). The second level, identification, refers to the specific subject, including named mythological, fictional, religious, or historical subjects (e.g., George Washington). The third level, interpretation, refers to the meaning or themes represented by the subjects and includes a conceptual analysis of what the work is about (e.g., political power).

  • Specificity and exhaustivity
    Include a general subject designation (e.g., portrait, landscape). Specific terms should also be recorded; however, the level of specificity and inclusiveness applied to cataloging the subject content of a work of art or architecture will depend upon various factors, including the depth of the cataloger's expertise and the quality and extent of information available.

  • Uncertainty
    Do not include information, such as interpretation, if you do not have scholarly opinion to support it; furthermore, if expert knowledge is unavailable, it is better to be broad and accurate rather than specific and incorrect (e.g., index a creature broadly as bird rather than specifically as goldfinch if you are uncertain of the species). If there is scholarly debate about the subject, explain the uncertainty in the Descriptive Note and index all probable subjects in Depicted Subject.

 

 

 

3.6.3.1.5

 

 

RULES for General Depicted Subject

 

 

 

3.6.3.1.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for General Depicted Subject
It is required to index the work using General Subject terms that would allow researchers to find all similar subjects (e.g., portrait, landscape, nonrepresentational).

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.2

 

 

Sequence Number (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.3.2.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the sort order of the general depicted subject terms.

 

 

 

3.6.3.2.2

 

 

Values
System generated.

 

 

 

3.6.3.2.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.2.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.2.5

 

 

RULES for Sequence Number

 

 

 

3.6.3.2.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Sequence Number
Order the general depicted subject terms according to the most prominent or most important subjects.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.3

 

 

Preferred Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.3.3.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the general depicted subject term is preferred or non-preferred for this record.

 

 

 

3.6.3.3.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.3.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.3.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.3.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.3.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Flag the general depicted subject term as preferred or non-preferred.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.4

 

 

Indexing Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.4.1

 

 

Definition
A classification of the level of subject description indicated by the indexing terms, for use if necessary to distinguish between what a work is "of" and what it is "about."

      • Examples
      • undetermined
        description
        identification
        interpretation

 

 

 

3.6.3.4.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.4.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.4.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.4.5

 

 

RULES for Indexing Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.4.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Indexing Type

Optional: Record a term to designate the type of subject being recorded. Use lower case. This designation will allow the distinction between a subject reflecting what the work is "of" (description and identification) or from what the work is "about" (interpretation).

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.5

 

 

Subject Extent

 

 

 

3.6.3.5.1

 

 

Definition
When there are multiple subjects, a term indicating the part of the work to which these subject terms apply.

      • Examples
      • recto
        verso
        side A
        side B
        main panel
        predella

        general
        overall

 

 

 

3.6.3.5.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.5.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.5.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.5.5

 

 

RULES for Subject Extent

 

 

 

3.6.3.5.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Subject Extent

Optional: Record a term designating the part of the work for which the subject terms are pertinent.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.6

 

 

Specific Depicted Subject

 

 

 

3.6.3.6.1

 

 

Definition
Indexing terms that characterize what the work depicts or what is depicted in it, including generic terms and proper names. These terms are more specific than the general subjects discussed above. They are drawn from several controlled sources, as described below.

      • Examples
      • Adoration of the Magi
        Annunciation
        Herakles
        Socrates
        Henry IV
        Thomas Jefferson
        Chicomecoatl
        Kalala Hunga
        Piazza San Marco (Venice, Italy)
        Himeji Castle (Hyogo prefecture, Japan)
        grand staircase, Opéra (Paris, France)
        Tokyo (Japan)

 

 

 

3.6.3.6.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.6.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.6.4

 

 

Discussion
Terms for Specific Depicted Subject access may come from various authorities, including AAT, TGN, ULAN, and CONA itself. For terms outside the scope of these four vocabularies, control terminology with the Iconography Authority for the proper names of the following: historical events; fictional characters, places, and events; religious or mythological characters or events; literary themes; iconographical themes. An authority with hierarchical structure, cross referencing, and synonymous names is recommended.

  • Person or Corporate Body: Links to ULAN provide indexing for people and corporate bodies depicted in the work, including the proper names of sitters and historical characters.

    Geographic Places: Links to TGN provide indexing for geographic locations depicted in the work, such as the proper names of cities or mountains.

    Generic Terms: Links to AAT provide for indexing subjects depicted that are not described by proper names (e.g., loving cups, tents).

    Works: Links to other works in CONA; to be used when one work depicts another, for example, if a drawing depicts a built work that is also documented in CONA.

    Iconography Authority: Links to the Iconography Authority (IA), which contains names/terms and other information for iconography and other subject terminology not contained in the other linked vocabularies. The IA includes proper names for events, religion/mythology, fictional characters, named animals, themes from literature, fictional places, and built works not recorded in CONA. The IA is further discussed below.

 

 

 

3.6.3.6.5

 

 

RULES for Specific Depicted Subject

 

 

 

3.6.3.6.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Specific Depicted Subject
Link to one or more specific subjects, as appropriate.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.7

 

 

Sequence Number

 

 

 

3.6.3.7.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the sort order for the specific depicted subject terms.

 

 

 

3.6.3.7.2

 

 

Values
System generated.

 

 

 

3.6.3.7.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.7.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.7.5

 

 

RULES for Sequence Number

 

 

 

3.6.3.7.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Sequence Number
Record an appropriate sort order value, ordering subjects by prominence or importance.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.8

 

 

Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.8.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the specific subject term is preferred or non-preferred for the record.

 

 

 

3.6.3.8.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.8.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.8.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.8.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.8.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.9

 

 

Indexing Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.9.1

 

 

Definition
A classification of the level of subject description indicated by the indexing terms, for use if necessary to distinguish between what a work is "of" and what it is "about."

      • Examples
      • undetermined
        description
        identification
        interpretation

 

 

 

3.6.3.9.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.9.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.9.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.9.5

 

 

RULES for Indexing Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.9.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Indexing Type

Optional: Record a term to designate the type of subject being recorded. Use lower case. This designation will allow the distinction between a subject reflecting what the work is "of" (description and identification) or from what the work is "about" (interpretation).

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.10

 

 

Subject Extent

 

 

 

3.6.3.10.1

 

 

Definition
When there are multiple subjects, a term indicating the part of the work to which these subject terms apply.

      • Examples
      • recto
        verso
        side A
        side B
        main panel
        predella

        general
        overall

 

 

 

3.6.3.10.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.10.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.10.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.10.5

 

 

RULES for Subject Extent

 

 

 

3.6.3.10.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Subject Extent
Optional: Record a term designating the part of the work for which the subject terms are pertinent.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.11

 

 

Outside Iconography Term

 

 

 

3.6.3.11.1

 

 

Definition
Terms for subjects taken from some outside source not included in AAT, TGN, ULAN, or the CONA Iconography Authority.
.

      • Examples
      • Hercules (Roman mythology)
      • (story of) Hercules (Heracles)

 

 

 

3.6.3.11.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.11.3

 

 

Sources
Standard sources of iconographical terms, such as Iconoclass or Library of Congress Subject Headings.

 

 

 

3.6.3.11.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.11.5

 

 

RULES for Outside Iconography Term

 

 

 

3.6.3.11.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Outside Iconography Term
Record an appropriate value from an outside source of iconographical terms.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.12

 

 

Outside Iconography Code

 

 

 

3.6.3.12.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the code or unique identifier for the subject in the cited iconographical source.

      • Examples
      • sh 85060359
      • 94L

 

 

 

3.6.3.12.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.12.3

 

 

Sources
Standard reference work for the iconographical term.

 

 

 

3.6.3.12.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.12.5

 

 

RULES for Outside Iconography Code

 

 

 

3.6.3.1.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Outside Iconography Code
Optional: Record the code or unique identifier for the subject in the authority cited. Cite the code exactly as represented in the authority, including punctuation and capitalization.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.13

 

 

Source

 

 

 

3.6.3.13.1

 

 

Definition
A link to the published work that provided the term used to index the depicted subject.

 

 

 

3.6.3.13.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by the Source Authority.

 

 

 

3.6.3.13.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.13.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.13.5

 

 

RULES for Source

 

 

 

3.6.3.13.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Catalog Level

If an outside iconography term is included, it is required to link to a citation for the source.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.14

 

 

Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.14.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the outside iconography term is preferred or non-preferred for this record.

 

 

 

3.6.3.14.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.14.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.14.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.14.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.14.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.15

 

 

Page

 

 

 

3.6.3.15.1

 

 

Definition
Page number, volume, date accessed for Web sites, and any other information indicating where in the source the information was found.

 

 

 

3.6.3.15.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.15.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.15.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.15.5

 

 

RULES for Page

 

 

 

3.6.3.15.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Page
Include the page number or other reference to where in the published work the term was found. If this is a unique identifier for the term, include it as Code as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONA ICONOGRAPHY AUTHORITY

 

 

 

 

 

Scope
Each record in this authority contains information about a named iconographical, literary, mythological, or religious character, animal, theme, or story, or a named historical or fictional event. It may also contain information about a named structure, particularly if the structure is not cataloged separately as an work in its own right. Information here is out of scope for TGN, AAT, or ULAN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.16

 

 

Iconography ID (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.3.16.1

 

 

Definition
Unique numeric identifier for the Iconography Authority record.

      • Examples
      • 1000021

 

 

 

3.6.3.16.2

 

 

Values
System generated.

 

 

 

3.6.3.16.3

 

 

Sources
N/A.

 

 

 

3.6.3.16.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.16.5

 

 

RULES for Iconography ID

 

 

 

3.6.3.16.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Iconography ID
The number is system generated and may not be edited.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.17

 

 

Iconography Parent (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.3.17.1

 

 

Definition
A link to the immediate parent of the iconography record.

 

 

 

3.6.3.17.2

 

 

Values
System generated.

 

 

 

3.6.3.17.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.17.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.17.5

 

 

RULES for Iconography Parent

 

 

 

3.6.3.17.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Iconography Parent
Link to the appropriate hierarchical level when adding a new Iconography Authority record.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.18

 

 

General Iconography Type (required)

 

 

 

3.6.3.18.1

 

 

Definition
A term indicating the general type of subject represented in the authority record.

      • Examples
      • event
        religion/mythology
        literature
        character/person
        named animal
        fictional place
        built work

 

 

 

3.6.3.18.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.18.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.18.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.18.5

 

 

RULES for Iconography Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.18.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Iconography Type
It is required to classify the iconography authority record according to general types.

The following examples illustrate each type:

  • religion/mythology (e.g., a theme Adoration of the Magi)
  • literature (e.g., Wuthering Heights)
  • character/person (a character, e.g., Zeus)
  • named animal (a character, e.g., Peter Rabbit)
  • event (whether real or fictional, e.g., Vietnam War, Judgment of Paris)
  • fictional place (legendary/imaginary/religious, e.g., Garden of Eden)
  • built work (e.g., Cathedral of Notre-Dame (Chartres, France); it is strongly recommended to place this record in CONA, but a truncated record is allowed here when the contributor cannot make a minimum CONA record)

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.19

 

 

Iconography Name (required)

 

 

 

3.6.3.19.1

 

 

Definition
The names used to refer to the subject, including the preferred form of the name, which is the form most commonly found in published sources. It also includes synonyms and variant names for the subject.

      • Examples
      • Epiphany
        Adoration of the Magi

        Adorazione dei Magi
        Hercules

        Herakles
        Ganesha

        World War I
        WWI
        Coronation of Napoleon Bonaparte
        American Civil War
        Hercules
        Olouaipipilele
        Virgin Hodegetria
        Death and the Miser
        Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

 

 

 

3.6.3.19.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.19.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.19.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.19.5

 

 

RULES for Iconography Name

 

 

 

3.6.3.19.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Iconography Name
It is required to record at least one name - the preferred name, which is the name or term used most often in scholarly literature to refer to the subject. Record one or more terms, names, appellations, or other identifying phrases for the subject.

  • Form and syntax
    Record proper names in upper case. For the names of events or narrative subjects, use title case. Avoid abbreviations for the preferred name (e.g., Saint John the Apostle Cathedral). Include common abbreviations in alternate names to provide additional access points (e.g., St. John the Apostle Cathedral). For the preferred name, use a name or term in the language of the catalog record (e.g., Adoration of the Magi in an English record, rather than the Italian Adorazione dei Magi). Note that, in some cases, the name most often used for a subject is in a foreign language rather than the vernacular language; if there is no English equivalent for a subject, use a name in the appropriate language (e.g., Ecce Homo). Use diacritics as appropriate. Express the name in natural order, not inverted order. Avoid initial articles (e.g., Argonaut Series rather than The Argonaut series).

  • Preferred name
    The preferred name should be the name used most often to refer to the subject in standard general reference works in the language of the cataloging institution. The preferred names should be the form that would be best used to index the subject in alphabetical lists. To select a preferred name, consult the sources recommended sources. If the name does not appear in authoritative and/or scholarly literature, choose the name used most often in the literature of art history or other professional literature in the language of the catalog record (English in the United States) (e.g., Hercules or Coronation of Napoleon Bonaparte). For names that are not found in standard sources, construct a preferred name.

  • Variant names
    Include all synonyms for the subject, including variations in spelling and names in other languages. Record all variant names that appear in published sources and represent significant differences in form or spelling, including variant names, names in multiple languages, variants that differ in diacritics and punctuation, name inversions, and other variations. The following list contains names that all refer to the same concept: Magi, Three Kings, Wise Men, Tre Re Magi.

  • Guide term and facet names
    If you use guide terms, create a descriptive phrase. Use lower case, unless the phrase contains a proper name. For facet names, capitalize the name for the sake of clarity in the hierarchical display.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.20

 

 

Sequence Number (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.3.20.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the sort order for the names of the iconographical subject.

 

 

 

3.6.3.20.2

 

 

Values
System generated.

 

 

 

3.6.3.20.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.20.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.20.5

 

 

RULES for Sequence Number

 

 

 

3.6.3.20.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Sequence Number
Adjust sort order to allow the most frequently used, current names to appear at the top of the list, to allow all current names in one language to appear together, and to place historical names for the iconographical subject at the bottom of the list.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.21

 

 

Preferred Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.3.21.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the name is preferred or non-preferred for the iconography authority record.

 

 

 

3.6.3.21.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.21.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.21.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.32.1.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.21.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Record an appropriate value from the controlled list, indicating if this is the preferred name or a variant name for the iconographical subject.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.22

 

 

Term Type (required)

 

 

 

3.6.3.22.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the type of name, to allow the authority to be compliant with standards for thesaurus construction, or to distinguish nouns from adjectival forms of names.

      • Examples
      • undetermined
        N/A
        descriptor
        alternate descriptor
        used for term
        noun
        adjectival form

 

 

 

3.6.3.22.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.22.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.22.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.22.5

 

 

RULES for Term Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.22.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Term Type
The default in CONA is currently "undetermined."

If instructed by your supervisor, record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.23

 

 

Qualifier

 

 

 

3.6.3.23.1

 

 

Definition
Word or phrase used as necessary to provide clarification or disambiguation.

      • Examples
      • daughter of Laomedon
        daughter of Oedipus

 

 

 

3.6.3.23.2

 

 

Values
Free test.

 

 

 

3.6.3.23.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.23.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.23.5

 

 

RULES for Qualifier

 

 

 

3.6.3.23.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Qualifier

Optional: It may be necessary to add a qualifier to distinguish between homographs. For example, Antigone (daughter of Laomedon) and Antigone (daughter of Oedipus). The qualifier is generally displayed with the preferred name in parentheses

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.24

 

 

Language

 

 

 

3.6.3.24.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the language of the name, particularly when the name is in a language other than the language of the catalog record.

      • Examples
      • English
        Italian

        Chinese (transliterated Pinyin)

 

 

 

3.6.3.24.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.24.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.24.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.24.5

 

 

RULES for Language

 

 

 

3.6.3.24.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Language
Optional: Record the language of the name, if known from authoritative sources. Choose a value from the CONA Language authority.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.25

 

 

Preferred Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.3.25.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether this name is the preferred name for the iconographical subject in a given language.

 

 

 

3.6.3.25.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.25.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.25.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.25.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.25.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Record an appropriate value from the controlled list indicating if the name is preferred or variant in a given language for this iconographical subject.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.26

 

 

Name Source (required)

 

 

 

3.6.3.26.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the source used as warrant for this name.

      • Examples
      • ICONCLASS (1978-)
      • Garnier, Thesaurus iconographique (1984)
      • Magill, Cyclopedia of Literary Characters (1990-1998)

 

 

 

3.6.3.26.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by the Source authority.

 

 

 

3.6.3.26.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.26.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.26.5

 

 

RULES for Name Source

 

 

 

3.6.3.26.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Name Source
Record the source(s) used for the name. In order to be a source, the name should have been translated precisely, retaining the diacritics, capitalization, and punctuation of the source.

  • Prefer the most authoritative, up-to-date sources available, which may include the following, arranged according to preference:

Standard general reference sources
- major authoritative dictionaries and encyclopedia
- LC Subject Headings

Other authoritative sources
- other authoritative subject thesauri and controlled vocabularies (e.g., ICONCLASS)
- textbooks on art history, history, or other relevant topics

Other material on pertinent topics
- books, journal articles, and newspaper articles
- archives, historical documents, and other original sources (for historical terms only)

Other sources
- databases of contributors
- articles or databases on museum or university Web sites

  • Standard general sources include the following, arranged in order of preference:

Iconographic Themes
- Garnier, François. Thesaurus iconographique : système descriptif des représentations. Paris: Léopard d'or, 1984.
- ICONCLASS (most useful for Western religious and mythological subjects) http://www.iconclass.nl/.
- Narkiss, Bezalel, et al. Index of Jewish Art: Iconographical Index of Hebrew Illuminated Manuscripts. Jerusalem and Paris: Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities: Institut de recherche et d'histoire des textes, 1976-1988.
- Roberts, Helene E. ed. Encyclopedia of Comparative Iconography: Themes Depicted in Works of Art. 2 vols. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn, 1998
- Stutley, Margaret. Illustrated Dictionary of Hindu Iconography. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1985.

Fictional Characters
- Magill, Frank N. Cyclopedia of Literary Characters. Revised Ed. Edited by A.J. Sobczak. Pasadena, California: Salem Press, 1990-1998.
- Seymour-Smith, Martin. Dent Dictionary of Fictional Characters. London: Orion Publishing Co., 1991.

Events
- Grun, Bernard. Timetables of History: Horizontal Linkage of People and Events. 3rd ed. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1991.
- Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary. 2nd ed. Thompson, Sue Ellen and Helene Henderson, compilers. Detroit, Michigan: Omnigraphics, 1997.
- Kohn, George Childs. Dictionary of Wars. Revised ed. New York: Facts on File, 2000.
- Library of Congress Subject Headings. Library of Congress Authorities. [online] Washington, DC: Library of Congress. http://authorities.loc.gov/.
- Mellersh, H.E. L. and Neville Williams. Chronology of World History. 4 vols. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 1999.

Names of Buildings
- America Preserved: Checklist of Historic Buildings, Structures, and Sites. 60th ed. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Cataloging Distribution Service, 1995.
- Avery Library. Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals at Columbia University. Boston: G.K. Hall & Co.; Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Trust, 1994-
- Dictionary of Art. 34 vols. Jane Turner, ed. New York: Grove, 1996, or by subscription at http://www.groveart.com/.
- Fletcher, Sir Banister. History of Architecture. 18th ed. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1975.
- Library of Congress Subject Headings. Library of Congress Authorities. [online] Washington, DC: Library of Congress. http://authorities.loc.gov/.
- Macmillan Encyclopedia of Architects. Adolf K. Placzek, ed. New York: Free Press; London: Collier Macmillan, 1982.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.27

 

 

Source Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.27.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether this name was the preferred or entry-form name for this iconographical subject in the source.

 

 

 

3.6.3.27.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.27.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.27.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.27.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Source Flag

 

 

 

3.6.3.27.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Source Flag
Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.28

 

 

Page

 

 

 

3.6.3.28.1

 

 

Definition
Page number, volume, date accessed for Web sites, and any other information indicating where in the source the name was found.

      • Examples
      • 54
        23 ff.
        7:128

 

 

 

3.6.3.28.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.28.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.28.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.28.5

 

 

RULES for Page

 

 

 

3.6.3.28.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Page
Record an appropriate value, based on rules in the Source Authority chapter.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.29

 

 

Descriptive Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.29.1

 

 

Definition
Additional information about the iconographical topic, including a discussion of its history, particularly noting any controversies or issues, presented in a form to be displayed to end users.

      • Examples
      • [for the Adoration of the Magi (Life of Christ )]
        Magi venerate the Christ Child, typically in the cave or stable where he was born. They often offer gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh, representing Christ's kingship, divinity, and future death. In early representations, they comprise three or four bearded men, who are astrologers with pointed Phrygian caps. By the Renaissance, they were generally three men portrayed as kings with crowns. They may be of three different races and represent the three ages of man (youthful, middle-aged, and elderly). They typically stand or kneel before the Holy Family, offering their gifts.

      • [for the American Revolution]
        Refers to an insurrection of 13 of Great Britain's North American colonies, from 1775 to 1783, which resulted in political independence and the formation of the United States of America. Following victory in the French and Indian War in 1763, the British government imposed taxes and other revenue-raising measures to force the North American colonies pay more of the cost of government and defense. Colonial discontent regarding these taxes, trade policies, and lack of representation in the British Parliament resulted in war breaking out between the British and Americans in 1775, and the declaration of independence by the American colonies in 1776. The American forces comprised state militia and a relatively small Continental Army. The well-trained British professional army was aided by German mercenaries. America was aided by France in 1778, Spain in 1779, and the Netherlands in 1780. Satirical images of the American grievances against Britain appeared in the years before war broke out. Depictions of themes and battles of the war itself first appear in the late 1770s, during the period when the war was still taking place. Romanticized depictions of the American victories and of theme of independence were popular through the 19th century, and often include George Washington and other major American protagonists.

      • [for Quetzalcóatl (Feathered Serpent)]
        The Feathered Serpent is one of the major deities of the ancient Mexican pantheon. Representations of a feathered snake occur as early as the Teotihuacán civilization (3rd - 8th centuries CE) on the central plateau, where Quetzalcóatl seems to have been conceived as an earth (vegetation) and water deity associated with the rain god Tlaloc. When Nahua-speaking (Toltec) tribes from the north arrived in the area, Quetzalcóatl's cult underwent significant changes, including an emphasis on blood sacrifice. The later Toltec culture (9th - 12th centuries), centered at the city of Tula, emphasized war and human sacrifice linked with the worship of heavenly bodies. In Aztec times (14th - 16th centuries) Quetzalcóatl was honored as the patron of priests, goldsmiths, craftsmen, and the calendar and books. He was also identified with the planet Venus, and was the god of the morning and evening star; thus he was the symbol of death and resurrection. In addition to being represented as a plumed serpent, Quetzalcóatl was often depicted as a man with a beard. He may be represented with his companion Xolotl, a dog-headed god. He may appear as Ehécatl, the wind god, when he is shown wearing a mask with two protruding tubes (through which the wind blew) and a conical hat typical of the Huastec tribe of northeastern Mexico. His representations may be associated with circular temples, which were believed to please Ehécatl because they offered no sharp obstacles to the wind.

 

 

 

3.6.3.29.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.29.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.29.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.29.5

 

 

RULES for Descriptive Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.29.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Descriptive Note

Optional: Record a single coherent statement covering some or all of the salient characteristics and historical significance of the iconographical subject. Include a brief description of the salient facts, actions, and events about the subject. Note how the iconographical subject is generally depicted in art, if pertien, but generally avoid including the names of specific works of art or architecture. You may mention a few specific works as necessary to make a point.

  • Form and syntax
    Use natural word order. You may use phrases or complete sentences, but always begin the note with capital letter and end it with a period. Use sentence case (not all capitals or title case). Capitalize proper names. Avoid abbreviations. Write the note in the language of the catalog record (English in the United States). Names and other words in foreign languages may be used within the note when there is no commonly used English equivalent. Use diacritics as appropriate.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.30

 

 

Iconography Display Date

 

 

 

3.6.3.30.1

 

 

Definition
The date or range of dates during which the iconographical subject is relevant or was portrayed in art.

      • Examples
      • first seen in the third century CE
        June 25, 1876
        Aztec

 

 

 

3.6.3.30.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.30.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.30.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.30.5

 

 

RULES for Iconography Display Date

 

 

 

3.6.3.30.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Iconography Display Date
Optional: Record the dates during which an iconographical subject was relevant. Include nuance and expressions of uncertainty as necessary. Follow rules and syntax as explained in Creation Date for the work record.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.31

 

 

Start Date and End Date

 

 

 

3.6.3.31.1

 

 

Definition
The earliest date and latest possible dates when an iconographical subject was first established or was used.

      • Examples
      • 1250
        -1000

 

 

 

3.6.3.31.2

 

 

Values
Controlled format.

 

 

 

3.6.3.31.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.31.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.31.5

 

 

RULES for Start Date and End Date

 

 

 

3.6.3.31.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Start Date and End Date
If an Iconography Display Date is recorded, it is required to index it with start and end dates.

  • Form and syntax
    Always record years in the proleptic Gregorian calendar in the indexing dates fields. Follow the applicable rules for dates in Creation Date for the work.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.32

 

 

Related Iconographical Subject

 

 

 

3.6.3.32.1

 

 

Definition
Associative relationships within the Iconography Authority. The identification of any iconographical subjects that have important ties or connections to the iconographical subject being cataloged, excluding hierarchical whole/part relationships

      • Examples
      • First Shenandoah Valley Campaign (American Civil War, Historical Events)
      • Joseph (New Testament, Christian Iconography)
      • Hindu gods (Hindu Iconography)
      • Labors of Hercules (Story of Hercules, Greek heroic legends, Classical Mythology)

 

 

 

3.6.3.32.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by linking to another record in the Iconography Authority.

 

 

 

3.6.3.32.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.32.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.32.5

 

 

RULES for Related Iconographical Subject

 

 

 

3.6.3.32.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Iconographical Subject

Optional: Identify any subject related to the subject being cataloged where there is an important associative relationship. Associative relationships are to "see also" references, and exclude whole/part hierarchical relationships

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.33

 

 

Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.33.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the type of relationship between the iconographical subject and another iconographical subject.

      • Examples
      • predecessor of
        associated with
        manifestation is
        consort is
        focus of
        predecessor was

 

 

 

3.6.3.33.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.33.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.33.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.33.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.33.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Type
If an associative relationship is added, it is required to record a Relationship Type. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.34

 

 

Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.34.1

 

 

Definition
Note containing additional information about the relationship.

 

 

 

3.6.3.34.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.34.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.34.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.34.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.34.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Note
Record a relationship note as required.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.35

 

 

Related Generic Concept

 

 

 

3.6.3.35.1

 

 

Definition
Information about a generic concept related to the subject at hand, including roles or other terms that characterize significant aspects of the iconographical subject.

      • Examples
      • domestic cat (common name) (Felis domesticus)
      • Christmas (Christian holidays)
      • rose (common name) (Rosa)
      • warrior
      • freedom

 

 

 

3.6.3.35.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a link to the AAT.

 

 

 

3.6.3.35.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.35.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.35.5

 

 

RULES for Related Generic Concept

 

 

 

3.6.3.35.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Generic Concept
Link to an appropriate value from the AAT. For singular iconographical subjects, link to the singular noun in the AAT (the AD). Link only to generic concepts that have a direct and important relationship to the subject.

  • Record a term or terms that characterize the most significant characteristics of the subject.

  • Form and syntax
    Generally record the singular form of the term; record a plural term if appropriate. Use lower case for most terms, but capitalize terms for style, that refer to a proper name, or other terms that are normally capitalized in authoritative sources. Avoid abbreviations. Record terms in natural word order, not inverted. Do not use punctuation, except hyphens, as required.

  • Include all terms that refer to the following: physical characteristics (e.g., elephant), characteristic roles (e.g., savior, king ), major functions (e.g., castle), activities (e.g., farming), purpose (e.g., transport), political anatomy (e.g., duchy), symbolic significance (e.g., charity), or other major characteristics.

  • Record terms only if they refer to the most significant or major characteristics of the subject, or otherwise are deemed critical for retrieval. Do not try to describe the subject using these terms; use the Iconography Authority Descriptive Note to describe the iconographical subject.

  • Record generic terms that characterize significant aspects of the subject in general. These are not characteristics of only one particular depiction of the subject (which is recorded in depicted subject for the work); instead, they should be general characteristics that will aid retrieval of all works that portray a given subject, no matter what the particular depiction in any single given work.

  • The goal of indexing these aspects of the subject is to allow access to the material by characteristics other than name. For example, the subject Ganesha could be indexed by terms indicating who Ganesha is and what he symbolizes: Hindu god, good fortune, elephant, good nature, strength, ritual circumambulation. The famous 19th-century nightclub, Chat Noir, which is the subject of a famous poster by Theophile Alexandre Steinlen, could be indexed by terms describing the activities of the club: cabaret, shadow theater, guignols.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.36

 

 

Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.36.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the type of relationship between the iconographical subject and the generic concept (AAT term).

      • Examples
      • attribute is
        personification is
        symbolic counterpart is

 

 

 

3.6.3.36.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a controlled list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.36.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.36.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.36.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.36.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Type
If a link to the AAT is added, it is required to record a Relationship Type. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.37

 

 

Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.37.1

 

 

Definition
Note containing additional information about the relationship.

 

 

 

3.6.3.37.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.37.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.37.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.37.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.37.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Note
Record a relationship note as required.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.38

 

 

Related Place

 

 

 

3.6.3.38.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of a geographic place related to the iconographical subject at hand.

      • Examples
      • Jerusalem (Yerushalayim district, Israel) (inhabited place)
      • Oe-yama (Kyoto prefecture, Kinki, Japan) (mountain)
      • Baetica (Roman Empire) (province)

 

 

 

3.6.3.38.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a link to TGN.

 

 

 

3.6.3.38.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.38.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.38.5

 

 

RULES for Related Place

 

 

 

3.6.3.38.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Place

Optional: Make links between the iconographical subject and geographic places. Link only places that have a direct and important relationship to the iconographical subject.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.39

 

 

Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.39.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the type of relationship between the iconographical subject and the place.

      • Examples
      • located in
        born in
        ruler of

 

 

 

3.6.3.39.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by TGN.

 

 

 

3.6.3.39.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.39.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.39.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.39.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Type
If a link to the TGN is added, it is required to record a Relationship Type. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

Only to places that exist or have existed are within scope for TGN. For mythological places, make a record in the CONA Iconography Authority, and link to it via an associative relationship.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.40

 

 

Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.40.1

 

 

Definition
Note containing additional information about the relationship.

 

 

 

3.6.3.40.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.40.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.3.40.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.40.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.40.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Note
Record a relationship note as required.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.41

 

 

Related Person / Corporate Body

 

 

 

3.6.3.41.1

 

 

Definition
An identification of people or corporate bodies associated with the iconographical subject.

      • Examples
      • Washington, George (American president, 1732-1799)
      • Agrippa, Marcus Vipsanius (Roman general, ca. 63-12 BCE)

 

 

 

3.6.3.41.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a link to ULAN.

 

 

 

3.6.3.41.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.34.1.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.41.5

 

 

RULES for Related Person / Corporate Body

 

 

 

3.6.3.41.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Person / Corporate Body
Link only to people or groups of people (corporate bodies) who are directly related to the iconographical subject.

  • Only people who exist or have existed are within scope of ULAN. For mythological figures, and for ancient religious people who have actually existed, record them in the CONA Iconography Authority and link through associative relationships.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.42

 

 

Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.42.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the type of relationship between the iconographical subject and the person or corporate body.

      • Examples
      • protagonist was
        founder was

 

 

 

3.6.3.42.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.42.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.42.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.42.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Type

 

 

 

3.6.3.42.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Type
If a link to ULAN is added, it is required to record a Relationship Type. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.43

 

 

Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.43.1

 

 

Definition
Note containing additional information about the relationship.

 

 

 

3.6.3.43.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.3.43.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.43.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.43.5

 

 

RULES for Relationship Note

 

 

 

3.6.3.43.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Relationship Note
Record a relationship note as required.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.44

 

 

Iconography Source

 

 

 

3.6.3.44.1

 

 

Definition
References to bibliographic sources or unpublished sources for the Descriptive Note and other information recorded in this Iconography Authority record, particularly for information other than names (which are linked in a separate instance of the Source Authority).

 

 

 

3.6.3.44.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a link to the Source Authority.

 

 

 

3.6.3.44.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.44.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.44.5

 

 

RULES for Iconography Source

 

 

 

3.6.3.44.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Iconography Source
It is required to list the sources used for the Iconography Authority Descriptive Note here. Link to other sources used for fields other than the name.

 

 

 

 

3.6.3.45

 

 

Page

 

 

 

3.6.3.45.1

 

 

Definition
Page number, volume, date accessed for Web sites, and any other information indicating where in the source the information was found.

 

 

 

3.6.3.45.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.3.45.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used.

 

 

 

3.6.3.45.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

3.6.3.45.5

 

 

RULES for Page

 

 

 

3.6.3.45.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Page
Record a reference to page, as explained in the Source Authority.

   

 

 

   

 

       

1"Required-default" indicates that a default is automatically set, but should be changed by the cataloguer as necessary.


Last updated 28 September 2010
Document is subject to frequent revisions




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