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Cultural Objects Name Authority Online
3. Editorial Rules, continued
 

3

EDITORIAL RULES, CONTINUED

   

3.6

 

Work Type, Creator, Dates, Location

Included in this chapter

   

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.1

 

 

Catalog Level (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the level of cataloging represented by the record, based on the physical form or intellectual content of the material.

      • Examples
      • item
        volume
        group
        subgroup
        collection
        series
        set
        multiples
        component

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.5

 

 

RULES for Catalog Level

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Catalog Level
The Catalog Level is required. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.2

 

 

Work Type (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.2.1

 

 

Definition
The kind of object or work described.

      • Examples
      • painting
        photograph
        drawing
        print
        bust
        statue
        bas-relief
        sketchbook
        portfolio
        installation
        performance
        tea set
        basilica
        dome
        monastery

 

 

 

3.6.1.2.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a link to the AAT.

 

 

 

3.6.1.2.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.2.4

 

 

Discussion

Note that a single work may have more than one Work Type (e.g., altarpiece, painting). Also, a single record may represent more than one object; if more than one object is being cataloged in a single CONA record (e.g., for a group-level record), record the multiple work types, arranged by sequence number in order of importance or frequency.


Specificity
Record one or more terms that characterize the type of work being cataloged, referring to the work's physical form, function, or media. It is recommended to use the most specific, appropriate term. The focus of the collection and expertise of the users should be considered; most institutions must accommodate both the expert and the general user. If a work type term refers to materials or technique (e.g., engraving) or any other characteristic that should also be indexed elsewhere in the record, repeat it in the additional appropriate fields.

Form and syntax
Record the singular form of the work type term for one work; record a plural term if more than one work is being cataloged in the CONA record.

What constitutes a work
A work can be a single physical thing, a fragment or part of a broken or dispersed work, a work composed of many parts, or an event considered an art work, such as a happening or other time-based, nonpermanent work.

Work may change over time
Work types may represent changes in the form or use of the work over time. The physical form or function of a work can change, such as when a sculptural group now located in a museum was originally used as a support for a table. A building that now houses a museum may have originally been designed as a church.

It is important to record a term for the work type at the time of creation, as well as all subsequent functions and forms. Work types may be used differently in different contexts by different repositories (for example, is a watercolor a painting or a drawing? It may depend upon whether or not the support is paper). Rely upon the scope notes in the AAT to choose appropriate work types.

Work Type and Classification
The Work Type is generally displayed with the Classification term. The Work Type is intended to identify the work that is the focus of the CONA record, whereas classification refers to broad categories or a classification scheme that groups works together on the basis of shared characteristics, including materials, form, shape, function, region of origin, cultural context, or historical or stylistic period.


 

 

 

 

3.6.1.2.5

 

 

RULES for Work Type

 

 

 

3.6.1.2.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Work Type
Work Type is required. Record an appropriate value from the AAT.

 

 


     

Note: As with all fields in CONA, for contributed records, do not change the work types as supplied by the contributor unless otherwise instructed by your supervisor.

 

 

 

 

 

Rules for assigning work types, if you have the authority to do so: Record the work type in sigular form for one item. Record the plural form of the term for multple items being indexed in the same record.

   

 

   

Record terms with sufficient specificity, based upon your knowledge. However, to not record a specific work type if documentation does not support it. If you are not certain of a specific work type, use a term about which you are certain.

Do not guess or make assumptions unless you have authoritative documentation regarding the use or other characteristics of work. For example, if you suspect that a drawing may be a working drawing, but you do not have documentation confirming this, you should use a more general term instead, such as architectural drawing or even drawing.

   

 

   

Sort the work types in an appropriate order, as described below.

 

3.6.1.3

 

 

Preferred Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.1.3.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the Work Type is preferred or non-preferred.

 

 

 

3.6.1.3.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.3.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.3.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

Flag as preferred the work type that best represents the use or form of the work. This is the work type that will appear in wall labels and other short descriptions of the work; choose an appropriate term accordingly.

 

3.6.1.3.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.1.3.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Set the flag to Preferred or Non-Preferred, as appropriate..

 

 


     

Within a given collection, be consistent in choosing work types. For example, if you have two altarpieces of similar design, materials, and date, do not label one with preferred work type altarpiece and the other with preferred work type panel painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.4

 

 

Sequence Number (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.1.4.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the appropriate sort order of the Work Type.

 

 

 

3.6.1.4.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.4.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.4.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

Most CONA records for a single item have only 1 to 5 work types. If you need to add more than 10, consult your supervisor.

When recording a group of works, many more work types may be included in order to properly index the group.

 

3.6.1.4.5

 

 

RULES for Sequence Number

 

 

 

3.6.1.4.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Sequence Number
Sequence Number is required. Record an appropriate value.

  • Number the work types in sequence. Do not skip numbers.

  • The work type in sequence number 1 should be the subject default Preferred work type, that will appear in labels.

  • Unless there is a reason to do otherwise, arrange the work types in reverse chronological order, with Current work types placed before Historical ones. However, other arrangements may be appropriate, depending upon context. Examples are given below.

 

 


     

Note that a single work may have more than one work type (e.g., altarpiece, painting). Arrange work types in the order of importance. The primary use or most important work types should be listed before work types expressing more minor roles of the work.

Where use has changed over time, typically record current work types before historical ones. Record historical work types in reverse chronological order, if pertinent. In certain cases, where the historical uses are more important than the current work type, another order may be chosen. For example, Hagia Sophia is most important as a historical church and then a mosque. Work types for this work would best be sorted in chronological order, from original use to present use.

Example [for Hagia Sophia]

1. church (building)
2. mosque (building)
3. museum (building)

Also note that a single record may represent more than one object; if more than one object is being cataloged in a single CONA record (e.g., for a group-level record), record the multiple object types, in the order of importance or frequency of occurrence within the group. The first work type, also the preferred, should represent a broad term referring to the bulk items in the group, if possible.

Example [for a group of works, order of frequency within the group]

1. architectural drawings (visual works)
2. axonometric projections (images)
3. plans (orthographic projections)
4. working drawings
5. correspondence
6. photographs

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.5

 

 

Historical Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.1.5.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the work type is current or historical.

 

 

 

3.6.1.5.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.5.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.5.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

Given that the use and form of a work may change over time, it is necessary to flag historical work types, if appropriate.

 

3.6.1.5.5

 

 

RULES for Historical Flag

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Historical Flag
Historical flag is required. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.6

 

 

Display Date for Work Type

 

 

 

3.6.1.6.1

 

 

Definition
A description of the date or range of dates when the work type is or was applicable.

      • Examples
      • from 500 BCE
        1993
        before 1652
        1842-1896
        17th century

 

 

 

3.6.1.6.2

 

 

Values
Free Text field.

 

 

 

3.6.1.6.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.1.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.6.5

 

 

RULES for Display Date for Work Type

 

 

 

3.6.1.6.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Display Date for Work Type
Optional: Record an appropriate Display Date for Work Type.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.7

 

 

Start Date / End Date

 

 

 

3.6.1.7.1

 

 

Definition
The earliest date and the latest date for which the work type is or was applicable.

 

 

 

3.6.1.7.2

 

 

Values
Controlled format..

 

 

 

3.6.1.7.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.7.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.7.5

 

 

RULES for Start Date / End Date

 

 

 

3.6.1.7.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Start Date / End Date
If a Display Date is recorded, it is required to record Start Date and End Date.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.8

 

 

Classification (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.8.1

 

 

Definition
Placement of a work of art or architecture within a classification scheme that groups other, similar works together on the basis of similar characteristics.

      • Example

      • Catalog Level: item
        Classification: paintings | European art
        Work Type: panel painting | predella panel

 

 

 

3.6.1.8.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.8.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.8.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

Classification terms or codes are used to place a work of art or architecture in a useful organizational scheme that has been devised by a repository, collector, or other person or entity. Formal classification systems are used to relate a work of art or architecture to broader, narrower, and related objects. Classification terms group similar works together according to varying criteria.

Kinds of classification schemes
This field generally does not include classification strictly by style, period, or subject, since these attributes are accommodated in their own fields. However, some repositories classify their collections by geographic region or period. A classification scheme may be a hierarchy, typology, or informal grouping. For example, with a hierarchically structured classification system based on general classes of objects, connections between the broader term (furniture) and the narrower terms (chairs, tables, or beds) can be made. A classification scheme based on social function might connect all works with a liturgical function, whether or not the object/types are textiles, metalwork, books, or furnishings. The placement of a work within such a scheme implies similarities among works within the logic of the classification.

The same work of art or architecture can be classified in many different ways. For example, a sculpture may be seen as both a carving and a mask; a lithographic poster may be classified as a print or an advertising graphic; a church may be classified as both a religious structure and a public building. The subcategories in this category repeat together as a group.

How a work is classified will often depend on the context within which it is being described. For example, a textile collection may have a much more detailed system for classifying textiles than a history museum does. A textile collection may classify a dress according to its construction, or the materials it incorporates. In a history museum, dress may be supplemented by more generic classifications, such as women's clothing or Ukrainian clothing.

Classification is often used to provide order for collections management. It may correspond to the structure of curatorial departments within a museum, although this is not always the case. Classification in terms of a shelf list or other scheme for noting the physical location of the object is a collections-management concern is not recorded in this field.

The assignment of classification terms should be based on local guidelines specific to a particular institution. Classification terms should be assigned after an examination of the object, if possible. Alternatively, published or unpublished sources may be consulted.

 

3.6.1.8.5

 

 

RULES for Classification

 

 

 

3.6.1.8.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Classification
Classification is required. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


     

For contributions: As with all CONA fields, do not change the classification value if it is contributed by a repository.

 

 

 

 

 

Whereas work types are in the singular form for single items and in the plural for multple items cataloged in the same CONA record, classification terms are usually in the plural.

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.9

 

 

Preferred Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.1.9.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the Classification is preferred or non-preferred.

 

 

 

3.6.1.9.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.9.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.9.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

The preferred classification term may appear in labels. Therefore, choose an appropriately broad and consistent term accordingly.

 

3.6.1.9.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.1.9.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Preferred Flag is required. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.10

 

 

Creator Display (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.10.1

 

 

Definition
The name, brief biographical information, and roles (if necessary) of the named or anonymous individuals or corporate bodies responsible for the design, production, manufacture, or alteration of the work, presented in a syntax suitable for display to the end-user and including any necessary indications of uncertainty, ambiguity, and nuance. If there is no known creator, make a reference to the presumed culture or nationality of the unknown creator.

      • Examples

      • Vincent van Gogh (Dutch painter and draftsman, 1853-1890)

      • Unknown Etruscan

      • attributed to Kicking Bear (Native American chief and painter, ca. 1846-1904)

      • Marco Ricci (Venetian painter, 1676-1730), figures by Sebastiano Ricci (Venetian painter, 1659-1734)

      • Peter King (English draftsman, 17th-18th centuries), with additions attributed to unknown English draftsman in the office of Nicholas Hawksmoor (English architect, 1661-1736)

      • Peter Paul Rubens (Flemish painter and draftsman, 1577-1640) after original by Titian (Venetian painter and draftsman, ca. 1488-1576)

 

 

 

3.6.1.10.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.1.10.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.10.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.10.5

 

 

RULES for Creator Display

 

 

 

3.6.1.10.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Creator Display
Creator Display is required. Record an appropriate free text value.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.11

 

 

Preferred Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.1.11.1

 

 

Definition
An indication whether the Creator Display is preferred or non-preferred for the work record.

 

 

 

3.6.1.11.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.11.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.11.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.11.5

 

 

RULES for Preferred Flag

 

 

 

3.6.1.11.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Preferred Flag
Preferred Flag is required. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.12

 

 

Contributor (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.12.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the contributor of the Creator Display.

 

 

 

3.6.1.12.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.12.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.12.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.12.5

 

 

RULES for Contributor

 

 

 

3.6.1.12.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Contributor
Contributor is required, but typically supplied when the data is created or loaded. Change the contributor only when necessary.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.13

 

 

Related Person / Corporate Body (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.13.1

 

 

Definition
Any people or corporate bodies important to the work, and thus requiring indexing, particularly any people or corporate bodies related to the creation, design, execution, production, or commission of a work of art or architecture and its components, including all those responsible for the creation of the work or items in a collection or archival group.

 

 

 

3.6.1.13.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a link to ULAN.

 

 

 

3.6.1.13.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.13.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.13.5

 

 

RULES for Related Person / Corporate Body

 

 

 

3.6.1.13.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Person / Corporate Body
It is required to index the creator as Related Person / Corporate Body.. Link to the appropriate artist in ULAN.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.14

 

 

Related Person Role (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.14.1

 

 

Definition
The role or activity performed by the person or corporate body in relation to the work, usually regarding the conception, design, or production of a work.

      • Examples
      • artist
      • painter
      • designer
      • printmaker
      • publisher
      • patron

 

 

 

3.6.1.14.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.14.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.14.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.14.5

 

 

RULES for Related Person Role

 

 

 

3.6.1.14.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Person Role
Related Person Role is required for any link to ULAN. Record an appropriate value for Role from the controlled list.

  • Singular vs. plural
    For a single person, use roles expressed in the singular (e.g., architect, painter). For corporate bodies, use a role that describes the entity (e.g., architectural firm, studio) or that is expressed in the plural (e.g., painters).

  • In the Role field, some controlled values for roles are used for both singular and plural, expressed by using an "s" in parentheses (e.g., wood engraver(s)). In the Display Biography, use the correct singular or plural, without the parentheses.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.15

 

 

Related Person Extent

 

 

 

3.6.1.15.1

 

 

Definition
The part of a work contributed by a particular creator or otherwise relevant to the indexed person or corporate body.

      • Examples
      • design
        predella
        execution
        additions
        figures
        sculpture
        embroidery
        engraved
        printed
        cast

 

 

 

3.6.1.15.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.15.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.15.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.15.5

 

 

RULES for Related Person Extent

 

 

 

3.6.1.15.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Person Extent
Optional: If appropriate, record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.16

 

 

Related Person Qualifier

 

 

 

3.6.1.16.1

 

 

Definition
An expression of the certainty with which a work can be attributed to a known person or corporate body, used when the attribution is uncertain, is in dispute, when there is more than one creator, when there is a former attribution, or when the attribution otherwise requires explanation.

      • Examples
      • attributed to
        assistant to
        workshop of
        studio of
        atelier of
        office of
        pupil of
        associate of
        follower of
        school of
        circle of
        copyist of
        style of

 

 

 

3.6.1.16.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.16.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.16.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.16.5

 

 

RULES for Related Person Qualifier

 

 

 

3.6.1.16.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Related Person Qualifier
Optional: Record an appropriate value from the controlled list, based on the definitions below.

 

 


     

No attribution qualifier
Using no attribution qualifier indicates that the repository and most or all scholars believe that the attribution to the named artist is certain. The same holds true for unknown artists who are identified by culture or nationality (e.g., unknown Celtic); if there is no attribution qualifier, the attribution to this culture is deemed secure.

Attributions to a known creator
Use one of the following qualifiers to express uncertainty when the attribution of a work to a known creator or architect is in question or to note a former attribution. The following may also be used for attributions to unknown artists (e.g., attributed to unknown Celtic).

attributed to: Use to express minor to moderate uncertainty regarding the attribution to a known artist, architect, or corporate body, as when the work's provenance, style, or physical characteristics strongly suggest a given creator, but the attribution cannot be validated with absolute certainty (e.g., attributed to Frans Hals (Dutch painter, ca. 1581-1666)).

formerly attributed to: Use to refer to an attribution that had been accepted in the past, but is no longer generally held to be valid (e.g., formerly attributed to Yan Wengui (Chinese, active ca. 970-1030)).

probably by: Use to express minor uncertainty regarding the attribution, generally indicating a slightly stronger probability than attributed to.

possibly by: Use to express significant uncertainty regarding attribution, indicating notably greater uncertainty than attributed to.

Unknown creators linked to a known creator
If the identity of a creator is unknown but he or she has worked closely with a known creator on the work, use an attribution qualifier to associate the work with the name of a known creator whose oeuvre is stylistically similar or otherwise related to the work at hand. In such cases, link to the known creator ULAN, but qualify the known creator's name with one of the qualifiers as described below.

Note: Do not use these qualifiers when the name of the creator of the object/work being cataloged is known or when an anonymous appellation is used for its creator (i.e., anonymous creators are those whose hand and oeuvre are known, but whose name alone is unknown, e.g., Master of the Caslav Panel). When named or anonymous creators (as opposed to unknown creators) have relationships to other artists, these relationships should be expressed in ULAN, not here in the Work record. For example, the Isaac Master worked in the workshop of Giotto. This working relationship surrounding the workshop should be recorded in the ULAN record for Giotto and the Isaac Master, NOT in work records by these creators.

Working directly with a known creator
Use one of the following qualifiers to indicate authorship by an unknown individual working directly for the named master, probably under his or her supervision. The distinction between workshop, studio, office, and atelier typically depends upon the historical period in question and the type of work being produced.

workshop of: Use for a work by an unknown artist or architect working under a master's name, generally in a system of apprenticeship common from ancient times through the mid-17th century (workshop of Gislebertus).

studio of: Use for a work by an unknown artist working for a named artist in a system common after the 16th century, when master artists took on pupils who were learning to be artists rather than apprentices who were learning a trade.

office of: Use for a work by an unknown architect working for a named architect in the 18th century through the present, when the group of people working for the architect calls itself an office (e.g., office of ChristopherWren).

atelier of: Use for a work by an unknown artist working for a named studio that called itself an atelier, generally reserved for those studios located in France, or in Britain after the 18th century.

assistant to: Use for a work by an unknown artist or architect working as an assistant to a named artist or architect whose staff is relatively small in number and do not call themselves a studio or an office. Also use for an assistant who worked in a studio or office, but in a special, close relationship to the named artist or architect.

pupil of: Use for a work by an unknown artist working under a named artist, where the relationship is apparently close, probably a student/teacher relationship; implies the unknown artist is probably younger or less experienced than the named artist; synonymous with student of.

associate of: Use for a work by an unknown artist working with a named artist, where the relationship is between two peers rather than between a student and teacher.

manufactory of: Use for a work by an unknown artist working for a named manufactory or factory, which is typically larger than a studio or workshop, and typically produces porcelain, tapestries, furniture, and occasionally fine art.

Not working directly with a known creator
Use one of the following qualifiers to refer to an unknown artist in direct contact with the works of the named creator, and living at the same time or shortly after him or her, though not actually working in his or her studio:

follower of: Use for a work by an unknown artist or architect whose style is strongly influenced by the named artist or architect, and who is living at the same time as or shortly after the named artist, but is not necessarily his or her pupil (e.g., follower of Hokusai).

circle of: Use for a work by an unknown artist who appears to be associated with the named artist, he or she is living at the same time as the named artist, and probably had some contact with him or her, but not is necessarily his or her pupil.

school of: Use for a work by an artist or architect whose style is influenced by the named artist or architect or by the associates of the named artist, who is living at the same time or shortly after the named artist, but is not known to be a pupil or direct follower of the named artist (e.g., school of Rembrandt).

Influenced by a known creator
Use one of the following qualifiers to indicate an influence of (or an outright copy of) the style of the named master, but with the connotation that the named creator had little or nothing to do with the actual work at hand. The unknown creator need not necessarily be a contemporary of the named master (e.g., style of Raphael or copyist of Rodin):

style of: Use for a work by an unknown artist whose style is strongly under the influence of the style of the named master (e.g., style of Raphael).

after: Use for a work by an unknown artist who has created a copy of a known work of the named artist.

copyist of: Use for a work by an unknown artist whose style seems to be a deliberate copy of the style of the named artist, but when the work at hand is not a direct copy of a known work by the named artist (e.g., copyist of Rodin).

manner of: Use for a work by an unknown artist whose style or elements of whose style are somewhat close to the style of the named artist, but whose work does not seem to be a deliberate copy of the named artist, and who generally lived in a period after the named artist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.17

 

 

Creation Date Display (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.17.1

 

 

Definition
A concise description of the date or range of dates associated with the creation, design, production, presentation, performance, construction, or alteration of the work or its components, presented in a syntax suitable for display to the end-user and including any necessary indications of uncertainty, ambiguity, and nuance.

      • Examples
      • 1889
      • 1766-1782
      • 12 December 2010
      • Christmas 1472
      • before 952 BCE
      • 1940-1949
      • ca. 1537
      • late 4th century BCE
      • 17th century
      • designed 1911, executed 1942-1948
      • reign of Rameses II
      • An II de la Republique (1794)
      • illuminated 2nd quarter of 11th century, binding probably dates from 12th century

 

 

 

3.6.1.17.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.1.17.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.17.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.17.5

 

 

RULES for Creation Date Display

 

 

 

3.6.1.17.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Creation Date Display
Creation Date Display is required. Record an appropriate free text value. It is required to also index this display with Start and End Date.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.18

 

 

Date Qualifier

 

 

 

3.6.1.18.1

 

 

Definition
A clarification of the meaning of the date, including an indication that different creative activities took place on different dates.

      • Examples
      • design
        execution
        alteration

        addition
        performance
        restoration
        destruction
        discovery
        bulk
        inclusive
        coverage
        publication

 

 

 

3.6.1.18.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.18.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.18.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.18.5

 

 

RULES for Date Qualifier

 

 

 

3.6.1.18.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Date Qualifier
Optional: Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.19

 

 

Start Date and End Date (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.19.1

 

 

Definition
The earliest and latest possible dates when the work of art or architecture was created. For works that were created over a span of time, this is the year when the work was designed or when execution was begun, and the year when it was completed. For uncertain or approximate dates, this is the earliest possible year when the work could have been begun or designed.

 

 

 

3.6.1.19.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled format.

 

 

 

3.6.1.19.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.19.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.19.5

 

 

RULES for Start Date / End Date

 

 

 

3.6.1.19.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Start Date / End Date
Start Date and End Date are required. The set is repeatable. If you repeat the set, however, you must define the meaning of the dates with Qualifier.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.20

 

 

Geographic or Corporate Body Location (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.20.1

 

 

Definition
The name of the repository or of a geographic location where the work is currently located. May also include discovery location and other types of locations.

      • Examples

      • Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, New York, USA)
      • Vienna (Austria)

 

 

 

3.6.1.20.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by ULAN and TGN.

 

 

 

3.6.1.20.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.20.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.20.5

 

 

RULES for Geographic or Corporate Body Location

 

 

 

3.6.1.20.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Geographic or Corporate Body Location
The current Geographic or Corporate Body Location is required. Record an appropriate value by linking to ULAN for corporate bodies (repositories) and to TGN for architecture and other works not in a repository.

  • For movable works, link to the name of a repository in ULAN, if possible.

  • For built works and when otherwise appropriate, link to a geographic location in TGN.

  • If the work is lost, destroyed, has location unknown, or the work is in an anonymous private collection, indicate this. Also include the repository number, credit line, and other administrative information about the work in the appropriate fields.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.21

 

 

Current Flag (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.1.21.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of whether the location is current or another type of location.

 

 

 

3.6.1.21.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.21.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.21.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.21.5

 

 

RULES for Current Flag

 

 

 

3.6.1.21.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Current Flag
Record an appropriate value from the controlled list. Recording a current location for the work is required.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.22

 

 

Location Type (required-default)

 

 

 

3.6.1.22.1

 

 

Definition
For locations other than current locations, an indication of the significance of this location as related to the work.

      • Examples
      • former
        creation
        discovery
        architectural context
        not applicable
        lost
        destroyed

 

 

 

3.6.1.22.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

 

 

 

3.6.1.22.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.22.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.22.5

 

 

RULES for Location Type

 

 

 

3.6.1.22.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Location Type
Location Type is required. Record an appropriate value from the controlled list.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.23

 

 

Repository Numbers (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.23.1

 

 

Definition
Any unique identifiers assigned to a work by the current or a former repository.

      • Examples

      • 1987.776.32 A
        P&D 3455-90
        86.DH.705.1
        AR1982:0002,#145: 116
        Barb. lat. 4434, folio 3
        Ms. Coll. E.2.I.28
        /503/1913

 

 

 

3.6.1.23.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.1.23.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.23.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.23.5

 

 

RULES for Repository Numbers

 

 

 

3.6.1.23.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Repository Numbers
Recording Repository Numbers is required, if known.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.24

 

 

Credit Line (required)

 

 

 

3.6.1.24.1

 

 

Definition
A brief statement indicating how the work came into the current collection or how it came to be on view at the repository; generally created by the repository.

      • Examples

      • Rogers Fund, 1949

      • Bashford Dean Memorial Collection, Gift of Edward S. Harkness, 1929

      • Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Gift, Joyce and Robert Menschel Gift and Rogers Fund, 1995

 

 

 

3.6.1.24.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.1.24.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.24.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.24.5

 

 

RULES for Credit Line

 

 

 

3.6.1.24.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Credit Line
If the repository requires a credit line, it is required to include it, if known.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

3.6.1.25

 

 

Address Note

 

 

 

3.6.1.25.1

 

 

Definition
An indication of the street address for a built work, or gallery or shelf location of a movable work within the repository.

      • Examples

      • Gallery 223, Asian Art, second floor
      • AF-009.45
      • Room 89
      • 234 Washington Street

 

 

 

3.6.1.25.2

 

 

Values
Free text.

 

 

 

3.6.1.25.3

 

 

Sources
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the rest of the record may be used, including data from the repostory of the work.

 

 

 

3.6.1.25.4

 

 

Discussion

 

 

 

 

3.6.1.25.5

 

 

RULES for Address Note

 

 

 

3.6.1.25.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements for Address Note
Optional: Record appropriate values in the Address Note.

 

 


       

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

   

 

       

1"Required-default" indicates that a default is automatically set, but should be changed by the cataloguer as necessary.


Last updated 15 April 2014
Document is subject to frequent revisions




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