The Getty
Research Home Search Tools & Databases Learn about the Getty Vocabularies Editorial Guidelines Cultural Objects Name Authority Online
Cultural Objects Name Authority Online
3. Editorial Rules, continued

3

EDITORIAL RULES, CONTINUED

   

3.5

 

Associative Relationships

Included in this chapter

     
     
  • Example
  • [for a terrestrial globe]
    Relationship Type: pendant of
    Related Work: Celestial Globe; globe (cartographic sphere); Nicolas Bailleul le jeune (French, active 18th century); 1730; J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles, California, United States); 86.DH.705.2

 

3.5.1

 

 

Related Works

     

3.5.1.1

 

 

Definition
Associative relationships to other work records in CONA, including various types of important ties or connections between works, but excluding hierarchical relationships.

     

3.5.1.2

 

 

Values
Values to represent the related entity in displays are concatenated automatically by the system, using the preferred name and other information from the linked record.

     

3.5.1.3

 

 

Sources: Warrant for linking the concepts
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the Descriptive Note may be used to determine which works are related. See 3.4 Descriptive Note.

     

3.5.1.4

 

 

Discussion
Link to works that have a direct relationship to the work of art or architecture being cataloged, particularly when the relationship may not be otherwise apparent from other categories. For example, works that are by the same artist or have the same subject need not be listed as related works unless there is a more direct relationship; however, when one of these works is preparatory for another, this special relationship should be recorded. 

Separate records: Ideally, separate records will be made for each related work, and the records will be linked. If the cataloging institution does not hold both objects, it may instead choose to make a reference to the related work in the Descriptive Note, but not a link to a separate record in Related Works. Over time, it is hoped that this will be remedied by researchers and users who create records and make links to aid discovery and access.

Only clear and direct relationships should be recorded. These direct relationships are typically current, but occasionally may be historical.

Given that associative relationships are used in retrieval to connect works linked in important ways, do not frivolously make links between Related Works. Relationships should be made only between records that are directly related, but where hierarchical relationships are inappropriate.

  • Example
  • [for a carpet in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art]
    Relationship Type: mate of
    Related Work: Ardabil Carpet; Maqsud of Kashan (Persian, active mid-16th century); 1540; Victoria and Albert Museum (London, England); 272-1893

Hierarchical relationship or associative relationship? Ideally, works that are related as siblings having a whole/part relationship to a parent (broader context) should be linked through hierarchical relationships. Examples of such siblings would be members of the same set or parts of the same historical whole.

However, if a record for the parent is not available in the data, the siblings may be linked to each other through associative relationships instead. Why must this happen? Often the record for the parent is not provided by a contributor, thus the hierarchical relationship cannot be made. This occurs for many reasons: when the repository itself does not maintain whole/part relationships in their data, when the whole/part relationship is historical, when the sibling to the contributed work is in another repository, or when the parent is a series or other conceptual, non-physical entity that is not recorded by the repository.

Siblings may be linked through associative relationships in CONA when necessary. Note that over time, the associative relationship may be deleted, replaced with a more appropriate hierarchical relationship where a parent is created and linked to its children (siblings of each other) as whole/part.

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.1.5

 

 

RULES

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.1.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements

Optional: Add an associative relationship, linking to a Related Work when necessary, if warranted by a situation described in Relationship Type below.

           

3.5.1.5.2

   

When to make Associative Relationships
Make links to Related Works when it is important to the end-user to have a cross-reference to the other works and when the works are directly related to each other but they do not have a hierarchical relationship.

>>Preparatory works

Record all temporal relationships reflected in works that are preparatory for other works, including studies, models, or other works that are steps in the creative process. Examples include a compositional study for a painting and the finished painting, a design drawing for a building and the finished building, or a model and the bronze sculpture cast from it.

    • Example
    • [for a design drawing by Benjamin Latrobe]
      Relationship Type: preparatory for
      Related Work: White House (Washington, DC, USA); presidential residence; 1792-1817

>>Paired works

Record all works that have or were meant to have direct spacial relationships, such as when two or more works were created to hang together as pendants or a pair, for example, portraits of George and Martha Washington painted by Gilbert Stuart and intended as pendants.

>>Sets and other groups of works

Ideally a separate record for the whole should be made when works form parts of the same set or group, or are or were parts of the same whole. To this separate record for the whole, the parts or members should be linked as hierarchical children (whole/part narrower contexts) rather than as associative relationships; see Hierarchical Relationships.

However, if contributed data for the works does not include this hierarchical relationship, or if the whole to which the parts belonged cannot be identified (e.g., pottery shards), the individual parts or sibling members should be linked to each other using associative relationships.

>>Reproductive relationships

Record reproductive relationships such as copies after other works, for example, Rubens' copy of Titian's Bacchanal (Prado, Madrid) or George Baxter's nineteenth-century print of Raphael's Descent from the Cross.

Do not link works through associative relationships if one work merely references the other; instead, use depicted subject to make the connection. For example, with Marcel Duchamp's "visual quotation" of the Mona Lisa, there should be a link to Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa as a subject of the Ducham painting, not through associative relationships.

>>Works depicting other works

Works that are depicted in other works should be linked through Associative Relationships only in rare cases.

If the works are important in the creation process, they should be linked through associative relationships.

If the works are themselves works of art that document the depicted work in a particularly important historical context, they may be linked through associative relationships.

In most cases, the work depicted, when not part of the creation process, should be linked through Specific Depicted Subject rather than associative relationships..

For visual surrogates, reproductive prints, or photographs considered works of art, link to the work depicted through associative relationships only if the image is an important document recording the history or construction of the work depicted. In almost all cases, such links should be made through Specific Depicted Subject rather than associative relationships.

If the work is a visual surrogate but not itself a work of art in its own right, place the record in the Visual Surrogates facet and link to the depicted work through Specific Depicted Subject.

>>Relationships to historical works

Associative relationships may be used to record relationships to both current and historical works, including lost or destroyed works, such as an original Greek sculpture known only through Roman copies, or a lost model-book that provided the source for an image found in many versions.

>>Former relationships

Other than the few critically important specialized relationships in the list below (e.g., formerly identified with), former relationships between works should be indicated by use of the Historical Flag.

>>Possible relationships

Other than the few critically important specialized relationships in the list below (e.g., possibly identified with), relationships that are only considered possible should be usually noted only in the Descriptive Note. If the relationship is important and held to be true by notable scholars, the works may be linked with appropriate Associative Relationships, with an explanation of the status as "probable" in the Descriptive Note.

>>Indirect relationships

Do not link works that clearly have only indirect (or extrinsic) relationships. Typically, it will be sufficient to discuss these relationships in the Descriptive Note. These indirect relationships include when one work supplies stylistic inspiration for another, for example, Van Gogh's works were inspired by the works of Rembrandt and Delacroix; the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building was inspired by the dome of Saint Peter's in Rome.

  • If one work is depicted in a minor or indirect way in another work, do not link them.

    Consider the benefits in automated retrieval: Will retrieving both works be meaningful, or will it be confusing and provide irrelevant results to end users? For example, if a painting depicts a sculpture among many other objects within the context of a genre scene, it is probably not practical or helpful to link the painting and the sculpture through associative relationships. However, the sculpture could be linked as a depicted subject of the painting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.2

 

 

Relationship Type

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.2.1

 

 

Definition
A phrase characterizing the relationship between the work at hand and the linked concept.

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.2.2

 

 

Values
Values are chosen from an extensible controlled list comprising a code and phrase. Each code-plus-phrase is linked to another code, which is the reciprocal relationship. Relationships are sometimes symmetrical, where the same relationship applies to both sides of the link.

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.2.3

 

 

RULES

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.2.3.1

   

Appropriate Relationship Types
It is required to include a Relationship Type for each Related Work.

  • Choose a specific suitable Relationship Type, if possible. Use the broad related to as a default if a more specific relationship is not appropriate.

>> Link to the correct side of the relationship

Remember that Relationship Types are reciprocal (that is, linked to both records). When you choose a Relationship Type, make sure that the Relationship Type and its counterpart will work from the points of view of both linked records.

  • For example, if you are in the record for drawing that is the study for a painting and you want to link to the painting, you should use 4115 / study for. In the painting record, the link to the drawing will then appear as the reciprocal relationship, 4116 / study is.

4115

study for

4116

4116

study is

4115

  • Test: The Relationship Type should make sense in a string or phrase like the following one, where the focus record is the one you are editing and the target record is the one to which you are linking:

Focus Record - Relationship Type - Target Record
drawing - [is] study for - painting

>>Avoid Redundant Relationships

Link a work to another work only once. If multiple relationships apply between the two, choose the predominant or most important relationship.

     

 

3.5.2.3.2

   

Definitions of Relationship Types

Apply Relationship Types according to the definitions below.

  • The relationship type list is extensible and frequently updated. As of this writing, the values below comprise the list.

>> List of relationship types

  • related to: General designation for relationships, where no specific relationship is known or appropriate.

    possibly related to and formerly related to may be used to indicate in a generasl way any of various possible or former relationships.

4000

related to

4000

4011

possibly related to

4011

4012

formerly related to

4012



  • miscellaneous: Do not use. This is reserved primarily to serve as the temporary default for problematic data loads.

4001

miscellaneous

4001



  • distinguished from: Use for linking two works that are commonly confused with one another, often in a historical context. For example, use where a documented work is often confused with an extant work.

    possibly identified with and formerly identified with may be used instead, as appropriate. An example would be when a documented work was formerly identified with an extant work, but now the association is no longer accepted by the scholarly community; the works were formerly identified with each other.

4100

distinguished from

4100

4101

possibly identified with

4101

4102

formerly identified with

4102



  • alternative reconstruction

    Refers to a reconstruction of a disassembled or destroyed work which is not the only possible reconstruction; the multiple reconstructions are linked to each other. Parts of the work may be linked to each reconstruction through non-preferred hierarchical relationships whole/part. For example, there may be two possible reconstructions of a lost altarpiece by Bartolo di Fredi; the reconstructions are linked to each other as alternative reconstruction, and the extant panels are each cataloged as separate works directly under Movable Works, and linked to each reconstruction non-preferred hierarchical parents.

4103

alternative reconstruction

4103



  • preparatory for / based on
  • Rather general designation, indicating one work was done in preparation for another. An example would be when a design drawing or a working drawing is preparatory in the creation of a built work. In this example, the precise purpose, such as working drawing or design drawing, should be indexed in Specific Depicted Subject.

4111

preparatory for

4112

4112

based on

4111



  • study for / study is
  • Refers to works in any medium of the visual arts that explore a subject or are preliminary to a separate, more finalized work. For example, a study by Ingres for the hands of a sitter may be linked to the finished painting.

4115

study for

4116

4116

study is

4115



  • prototype for / prototype is
  • Refers to works that serve as the working model for the production of subsequent copies. For example, a glass vessel to be produced by a Murano glass manufactory would first be designed as a prototype.

4117

prototype for

4118

4118

prototype is

4117



  • cartoon for / cartoon is
  • Refers to full-size preparatory drawings made for the purpose of transferring a design to the working surface for another work. For example, designs for frescoes by Raphael were drawn on a paper cartoon, and the outlines transferred to the wall for painting.

4121

cartoon for

4122

4122

cartoon is

4121



  • model for / model is
  • Refers to a scaled representation of another work, usually three-dimensional and usual preparatory. For example, porcelain figures are typically worked out first as models, from which molds are made; the dome of St. Peter's in Rome was produced as a scale model as part of the process of having the project approved.

4125

model for

4126

4126

model is

4125



  • plan for / plan is
  • Refers to works comprising a formal concept of the layout of spaces and elements of another work. They may be preparatory, or done as a record after construction. An example would be a floorplan of the Bastille in Paris. Examples may include not only orthographic projections of buildings, but other sorts of plans as well.

4131

plan for

4132

4132

plan is

4131



  • original work is / counterproof from
  • Refers to a work comprising an impression taken from an original work, usually a print or drawing, but sometimes textual works as well. For example, a counterproof may be pressed from an original chalk drawing by Watteau, creating a lighter and mirror-image copy; a fresh sheet of paper may be placed on a printed image or text and run through the press again, to make a counterproof copy.

4133

original work is

4134

4134

counterproof from

4133



  • printing plate/block for / printed from plate/block
  • Refers to works comprising flat, or nearly flat, surfaces from which textual or pictorial works are printed. For example, an Edo-era wooden block made may still exist from which extant Japanese prints were printed.

4135

printing plate/block for

4136

4136

printed from plate/block

4135



  • printed from same plate/block
  • Refers to multiples comprising textual or pictorial works that were printed from the same plate, block, or other flat surface. For example, Edo-era prints printed from the same block may be linked to each other.

4137

printed from same plate/block

4137



  • negative for / printed from negative
  • Refers to photographic negatives in which the tones or colors are reversed, usually on a transparent support, intended for the purpose of producing positive prints. For example, a negative from Ansel Adams may still exist, and can be linked to photographic prints made from it.

4141

negative for

4142

4142

printed from negative

4141



  • from same negative
  • Refers to multiples in the form of photographic prints, that were printed from the same negative photograph. The prints made from a single Ansel Adams negative may be linked to each other.

4143

printed from same negative

4143



  • positioned/located with/near
  • Rather general designation, indicating that one work is positioned or located with or near another; use when the placement is significant because the works are somehow related. For example, the monument Stone Henge is located near the newly discovered ruins of Durrington Walls Henge; the Baptistry of Florence, Italyis placed near the Cathedral and bell tower of Florence. To indicate the current geographic location or creation place of the work, use the Location field.

4210

positioned / located with / near

4210



  • companion piece of
  • Refers to a work designed to be displayed or used with one or more other works, not necessarily matching and not necessarily numbering only two. For example, a footstool and side table may be companion pieces to a chair.

4211

companion piece of

4211



  • pendant of
  • Refers to a work designed to be displayed together as a pair with another work, usually side by side or facing one another. For example, a portrait of a husband may be a pendant of a portrait of the wife.

4212

pendant of

4212



  • mate of
  • Refers to a work designed to be used together with another work, but not necessarily side by side in display. For example, one ancient Greek earring may be a mate of a second earring.

4213

mate of

4213



  • conjuncted with
  • Refers to a work designed to always be used with another work of equal status, but not a pair of objects having the same work type. For example, a cup may be conjuncted with its matching saucer.

4114

conjuncted with

4114



  • part of same whole
  • Refers to a work that is, with one or more other works, are components or parts of another work. For example, two engraved plates may have a relationship to each other because they are part of the same book.

4215

part of same whole

4215



  • member of same set/group
  • Refers to a work that is part of the same set as another work. For example, four side chairs may be related to each other because they are all be members of the same set.

4217

member of same set/group

4217



  • member of same series
  • Refers to a work that is part of the same series as one or more other works; series are works intended by the artist to be viewed or considered together. For example, one painting of a wheatstack by Monet is related to his other paintings of wheatstacks because they belong to the same series.

4218

member of same series

4218



  • member of same ensemble
  • Refers to a work that is part of the same ensemble, which is a grouping of works, including costume. For example, a historical Dior coat, hat, and dress may be related because they were designed to be worn together.

4219

member of same ensemble

4219



  • from same model
  • Refers to a work cast or otherwise created from the same model as other works. For example, figures in Rodin's Gates of Hell in Paris were cast from the same models as figures in his Gates of Hell in Zurich.

4243

cast from same model

4243



  • from same mold
  • Refers to a work cast or pressed from the same mold as another work. For example, a porcelain doll's head may be cast from the same mold as another porcelain doll's head.

4244

from same mold

4244



  • based on same design
  • Refers to a work that is based on the same design as another work. For example, two similar historical Dior coats may both represent the same basic design, even though they are made in different colors and fabrics; several works by Medardo Rosso entitled Ecce Puer may be variants on the same portrait design, although not copies nor cast from the same model.

4245

based on same design

4245



  • copy after / based on
  • Refers to a work that is copied after another work. For example, a Roman marble statue may be a copy after a lost Greek bronze original.

4311

copy after

4312

4312

copy is

4311



  • pastiche copy after / pastiche copy is
  • Refers to a work that is partially copied after another work, but having certain features or parts copied from a second work or added as original. An example is a Velázquez copy of a portrait of Philip IV by Rubens, where Velázquez has changed the face of the sitter and certain other features.

4313

pastiche copy after

4314

4314

pastiche copy is

4313



  • facsimile of / facsimile is
  • Refers to a work that is intended to reproduce another work, usually of the same size. An example is a late 16th-century illustrated book that uses the more efficient printing press and engravings to reproduce an earlier book that had been illustrated with woodcuts.

4315

facsimile of

4316

4316

facsimile is

4315



  • derived from / source for
  • Refers to a work that is strongly influenced by or derived from another work, but not to the extent that it is a copy; for most works that are simply influenced by another, the connection is not strong enough to make this associative relationship. An example of when it is appropriate would be when one print from the period of the French Revolution is strongly and intentionally referenced in a second print during the Revolution; a plate in a book for architectural column capitals may be the source for column capitals in a built work.

4321

derived from

4322

4322

source for

4321



  • depicts / depicted in
  • Refers to a work that is itself a work of art and documents the depicted work in a particularly important historical context. In most cases, this link is better made through Depicted Subject. For preparatory works, prefer 4111/4112 preparatory for/based on.

4325

depicts

4326

4326

depicted in

4325



  • context is / context for
  • Refers to a work that was designed for and used in the context of another work, usually a larger or more important work. An example is a Rococo frame, which is itself considered a work, that was made specifically to frame a particular portrait painting. For works of equal status that are intended to be together, use 4114 conjuncted with or another appropriate relationship type.

4391

context is

4392

4392

context for

4391



  • architectural context is / is architectural context for
  • Refers to a work that is designed and placed within a built work or other monumental work. An example is a sculpture designed for and placed in an Arc de Triomphe; a fresco cycle may be placed within a chapel, which is a built work.

4393

architectural context is

4394

4394

is architectural context for

4393



  • formerly part of same whole
  • Refers to a work that together with another work was at some point part of the same whole. Examples would be related pottery shards for which the whole is now unknown; also, panels of a disassembled altarpiece that are now be dispersed in different repositories.

4512

formerly part of same whole

4512



  • former architectural context was / formerly was architectural context for
  • Refers to a work that was created for an architectural context but no longer resides there. For example, a stained glass panel now in the Metropolitan Museum in New York was formerly part of a window in Rouen Cathedral in France.

4515

former architectural context was

4516

4516

formerly was architectural context for

4515



  • former context was / formerly was context for
  • Refers to a work that was designed for and used in the context of another work, usually a larger or more important work, but is no longer positioned there. For example, an important picture frame may have been formerly placed on a given portrait, but now the portrait is framed with another frame.

4517

former context was

4518

4518

formerly was context for

4517



  • predecessor of / replaced
  • Refers to one work having replaced another in usage or position; usually reserved for architecture. For example Old Saint Peter's in Rome was the predecessor of its replacement, the new Saint Peter's basilica and complex.

4601

predecessor of

4602

4602

replaced

4601

     

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.2.3.3

 

 

Adding new Relationship Types
If you feel that another Relationship Type is required, consult with your supervisor.



 

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.3

 

 

Historical Flag

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.3.1

 

 

Definition
Flag indicating the historical status of the relationship of this Work to the Related Work.

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.3.2

 

 

Values
Values are controlled by a list.

current
historical
both
not applicable
undetermined

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.3.3

 

 

RULES

Flag the relationship as current or historical as necessary.

  • Most associative relationships will be current. If the relationship is historical, flag it appropriately. If there is a designated Relationship Type indicating a former relationship, for example 4102/formerly identified with, use that relationship type rather than flagging it historical here.

    • Current: For relationships that still exist, even though they may have been established long ago, use current.

    • Historical: For a relationship that no longer exists.

    • Both: For a relationship that is both current and historical.

    • Not applicable: Do not use this flag without consulting your supervisor.

    • Unknown: Used primarily for data that is loaded into VCS. Do not use this flag without consulting your supervisor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.4

 

 

Dates for Related Works

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.4.1

 

 

Definition
Dates delimiting the relationship between the two works.

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.4.2

 

 

Fields
There are three fields: Display Date, Start Date, and End Date.

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.4.3

 

 

Values

Display Date is a free-text field; values may be any Unicode character or numbers.

Start Date and End Date must contain valid years, as validated by VCS.

 

 

 

 

 

3.5.4.4

 

 

Sources
The dates should be determined using the same auhoritative sources that supply other information about the relationship.

 

 

 

3.5.4.5

 

 

Discussion
The Display Date for the relationship usually refers to a period or date, however, it may sometimes contain notes that do not explicitly make reference to a date. In such cases, the note should implicitly refer to a date or datable condition or event, because you are required to include a Start Date and End Date with every Display Date.

  • Display dates are indexed with Start Date and End Date. Start and End Dates are controlled by special formatting; dates BCE are represented by negative numbers.

 

 

 

3.5.4.6

 

 

RULES

Dates are not appropriate for most associative relationships in CONA. Enter dates only where pertinent.

  • If you enter data in any of the three fields, you must enter data in all three of the fields.

  • The dates appear on reciprocal links. That means that the same dates will appear in both records. Write the Display Dates and assign Start and End Dates so that they will be correct and unambiguous in both records. Repeat the titles of the works in the Display Date when necessary to avoid ambiguity.

  • A brief set of rules for Dates appears below. See also Appendix B: Dates and Dates for Titles.

 

 

 

3.5.4.6.1

   

Display Date
Express the date for display to end users. Express nuance and ambiguity as necessary.

  • Follow the style of existing Display Dates.

    • Examples
    • Display Date: pertinent after 1520
      Start Date: 1520 End Date: 9999

    • Display Date: since the mid-18th century
      Start Date: 1730 End Date: 9999

    • Display Date: from the Baroque period
      Start Date: 1590 End Date: 9999

  • Do not use an initial capital, unless the word is a proper name.

  • Do not use full sentences; do not end the display date with a period or any other punctuation.

  • Ideally, the display date should refer, explicitly or implicitly, to a time period or date associated with the link between the Related Works.

  • If a date is uncertain, use a broad or vague designation (e.g., ancient) or other terms such as ca. and probably to express uncertainty (e.g., ca., in the example below).

    • Example
    • Display Date: from ca. 1810 through 1940
      Start Date: 1800 End Date: 1940

  • In some cases, the Display Date may be used to record unusual or important information about the Related Concept relationship (see the example below), but not referring explicitly to a date. However, dates should be implicit in the condition or event mentioned and you should have a period or date in mind, because - if you record a Display Date - Start and End dates are required.

    • Example
    • Display Date: pertinent for native inhabitants along the seacoast from Niantic Bay to the Connecticut River
      Start Date: 1400 End Date: 1900
   

 

3.5.4.6.2

   

Start Date and End Date
Use dates that most broadly delimit the span of time of the relationship referred to in the display date. In many cases, the years will be approximate years. When in doubt, it is better to estimate too broad a span rather than too narrow a span. See Appendix B: Dates for spans of dates of historic events and entities.

  • Dates must be expressed in the proleptic Gregorian calendar, which is the Gregorian calendar projected back in time before it came into existence.

  • Express dates BCE by negative numbers, using a hyphen before the number. Do not use commas or any other punctuation.

    • Example
    • Display Date: only as related to Banshan urns
      Start Date: -2800 End Date: -2300

  • For current relationships, use the End Date 9999.

    • Example
    • Display Date: from 1810
      Start Date: 1810 End Date: 9999

  • For very ancient dates, expressed as years ago or before present in the Display Date, translate these dates into approximate years in the proleptic Gregorian calendar for the Start and End Dates.
   

 

3.5.5

   

Qualifier for Related Works

   

 

3.5.5.1

   

Definition

Alphanumeric indicator or phrase that qualifies the relationship between related works. May also contain other codes or qualifying text about the relationship.

  • Examples

  • sequence A
    scene 45
    1st in series
    Steiner A19
    Before = #1, After = #2


   

 

3.5.5.2

   

Values
This is not a controlled field. However, consistent use of capitalization, punctuation, and syntax is recommended.

   

 

3.5.5.3

   

Sources
Use the same authoritative sources used for the rest of thre record.

   

 

3.5.5.4

   

Discussion
It is often important to indicate the sequential position or other relationship of one work to another. For example, in the relationship between siblings that are or were part of a whole, such as the folio or page number in a volume, the act and scene number of a cel that is part of an animated film, or the position of a particular print in a series of prints.

Other sorts of positional or chronological codes or notes may be included. For example, for a pair of pendant paintings, the intended position of left and right placement may be noted.

Keep in mind that this Qualifier note is reciprocal and symmetric, in that it displays in both records. Therefore, phrase it so that it works for both records (e.g., Before = #1, After = #2).

   

 

3.5.5.5

   

RULES

   

 

3.5.5.5.1

   

Minimum Requirements

Optional: Record a phrase or number that concisely describes the physical or intellectual position of this work in relation to other related works.

Use consistent syntax and punctuation. Doing so will allow this field to be used to sort related works in a logical order.

   

 

   

 

   

 

Last updated 30 September 2015
Document is subject to frequent revisions

 




Back to Top

The J. Paul Getty Trust
The J. Paul Getty Trust
© J. Paul Getty Trust | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use