Event Calendar
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Performances and Films/Videos
Lectures and Conferences
Tours and Talks
Family Activities
Courses and Demonstrations
Exhibitions
Food Events
Free Hours at L.A. Museums (PDF, 269 KB)
Art Platform – Los Angeles
A + D Museum
Autry National Center
Craft and Folk Art Museum
Fowler Museum at UCLA
Hammer Museum
Huntington Library
Japanese American National Museum
LACMA
Los Angeles Public Library
MAK Center for Art & Architecture
MOCA
Museum of Latin American Art
Natural History Museum
Norton Simon Museum
Orange County Museum of Art
Pacific Asia Museum
Pasadena Museum of California Art
Santa Monica Museum of Art
Skirball Cultural Center
April 14, 2013
Lectures and Conferences
Does Architecture Matter?
Sunday April 14, 2013
2 pm - 6:30 pm
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, Getty Center


Does the work of architects really matter in our daily lives? Do all of the inventive forms found in the new wave of buildings dotting our cities change the lives of their inhabitants, or are these structures merely self-contained monuments to an era and its egos? Zócalo Public Square and the J. Paul Getty Museum present a half-day conference exploring the impact of architecture on the present and future.

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Tours and Gallery Talks
Garden Tour
Daily
11:30 am, 12:30 pm, 2:30 pm, 3:30 pm
Getty Center


The gardens of the Getty are the focus of this 45-minute tour. Meet the docent outside at the bench under the sycamore trees near the front entrance to the Museum.

Getty Center
Architecture Tour
Daily
10:15 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 2 pm, 3 pm, 4 pm
Museum Entrance Hall, Getty Center


Discover more about Richard Meier's architecture and the design of the Getty Center site in this 45-minute tour. Meet the docent outside at the bench under the sycamore trees near the front entrance to the Museum.

Halberdier / Pontormo
Collection Highlights Tour
Daily
11 am
Museum Galleries, Getty Center


This one-hour tour provides an overview of major works from the Museum's collection. Meet the educator at the Museum Information Desk.

Halberdier / Pontormo
Collection Highlights Tour
Sundays
1:30 pm
Museum Galleries, Getty Center


This one-hour tour provides an overview of major works from the Museum's collection. Meet the educator at the Museum Information Desk.

Exhibitions
The  Life of Art
The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display
Daily

South Pavilion, Plaza Level, Getty Center


From the time an object is made until the day it enters a museum's collection, it may be displayed, used, and perceived in different ways. The Life of Art takes selected objects from the Getty Museum's galleries and encourages visitors to sit down and spend time with them, offering the opportunity to examine them closely to understand how they were made and functioned, why they were collected, and how they have been displayed. Through careful looking, what may be learned about the maker and previous owners of a French gilt-bronze wall light, for example, or the transformation in England of a Chinese porcelain bowl? Close engagement reveals the full lives of these works and why they continue to be collected and cherished today.

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Untold Stories
Untold Stories: Collecting and Transforming Medieval Manuscripts
Daily through May 12, 2013

North Pavilion, Plaza Level, Getty Center


For hundreds of years, manuscripts have been bought and sold, hidden and displayed, preserved and rearranged, loved and forgotten, cut into pieces, hung on the wall, and glued into albums. At times valued for their beauty, for their religious significance, or simply for the strength of their parchment pages, the manuscripts in this exhibition have been transformed again and again to suit the changing expectations of their various audiences and owners. Drawn from the Getty Museum's permanent collection and including several outside loans, the exhibition reveals the ways in which manuscripts have been refashioned both conceptually and physically and explores the long and eventful history of these books before their entry into the Museum.

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Looking East: Rubens's Encounter with Asia
Looking East: Rubens's Encounter with Asia
Daily through June 9, 2013

West Pavilion, Plaza Level, Getty Center


Peter Paul Rubens was one of the most talented and successful artists working in seventeenth-century Europe. During his illustrious career as a court painter and diplomat, Rubens expressed a fascination with exotic costumes and headdresses. With his masterful handling of black chalk and touches of red, Rubens executed a compelling drawing that features a figure wearing Asian costume—a depiction that has recently been identified as Man in Korean Costume. Now in the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum, this drawing is the focal point of an exhibition that explores for the first time what the Flemish artist could have known about Asia in general and Korea in particular.

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Japan's Modern Divide
Japan's Modern Divide: The Photographs of Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto
Daily through August 25, 2013

West Pavilion, Lower Level, Getty Center


This exhibition presents the work of two photographers whose careers spanned much of the twentieth century, or the Showa Era (1926–1989) as it is known in Japan. Hiroshi This exhibition presents the work of two photographers whose careers spanned much of the twentieth century, or the Showa Era (1926–1989) as it is known in Japan. Hiroshi Hamaya (1915–1999) and Kansuke Yamamoto (1914–1987) began as teenagers to experiment with various formal approaches and techniques in photography. As their work matured, however, they took very different paths. Through the display of works from Japanese as well as U.S. collections, the exhibition examines two important strains in Japanese photography: the documentary investigation of regional traditions and social issues, represented in the work of Hamaya; and the avant-garde movement that developed in the context of Western surrealism and advanced through the work of Yamamoto. These two trends not only reflect significant, though rarely shown, activity in the history of Japanese photography but also reveal the complexity of modern life in that nation since the Meiji Restoration.     

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Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940-1980
Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940–1990
Daily through July 21, 2013

Exhibitions Pavilion, Getty Center


During the period 1940 to 1990, Los Angeles rapidly evolved into one of the most populous and influential industrial, economic, and creative capitals in the world. This dynamic exhibition provides an engaging view of the region's diverse urban landscape, including its ambitious freeway network, sleek corporate towers, whimsical coffee shops, popular shopping malls, refined steel-and-glass residences, and eclectic cultural institutions. Drawings, photographs, models, films, animations, oral histories, and ephemera illustrate the complex dimensions of L.A.'s rich and often underappreciated built environment, revealing this metropolis's global impact as a vibrant laboratory for cutting-edge design. Co-organized by the Getty Research Institute and the J. Paul Getty Museum, this exhibition is part of the initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.

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In Focus: Ed Ruscha
In Focus: Ed Ruscha
Daily through September 29, 2013

West Pavilion, Lower Level, Getty Center


Photography has played a central role in Ed Ruscha's artistic practice, most notably in the photobooks he began publishing in 1963. Highlighting important recent acquisitions by the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute, this exhibition features a selection of prints and materials related to Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1963), Some Los Angeles Apartments (1965), and Every Building on the Sunset Strip (1966). Also on view for the first time are contact sheets from his shoot of the Pacific Coast Highway (1974–75), one of the many streets he has documented extensively since 1965. The exhibition offers a concentrated look at Ruscha's engagement with vernacular architecture, the urban landscape, and car culture. Co-organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute, this exhibition is part of the initiative Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.

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Farewell to Surrealism
Farewell to Surrealism: The Dyn Circle in Mexico
Daily through April 14, 2013

Research Institute Exhibition Gallery, Getty Center


In the 1940s, an international circle of writers and artists from Europe, Latin America, and North America came together in Mexico City and created the unique journal Dyn. Many of them—including the journal's founder and primary editor, Wolfgang Paalen—had been part of Andre Breton's Parisian surrealist circle in the 1930s, before taking refuge in Mexico during World War II. This group shared a passion for the pre-Columbian past of the Americas, and their immersion in its artifacts transformed their art. Dyn is a record of their ideas and the art they made, an art that had ramifications far beyond Mexico City.

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April 14, 2013
Courses and Demonstrations
Handling Session: Marble Carving
Sundays through August 25, 2013
11 am - 12 pm
Reading Room, Getty Villa


How were blocks of rough stone carved into sensuous sculptures? Find out in this multisensory handling session! Touch tools and materials used by ancient sculptors, including chisels, points, and rasps. Discover also how marble sculptures were once painted in brilliant colors. Complements the exhibition Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome. This is a free, drop-in program.

Myths and Monsters
Sunday April 14, 2013
1 pm - 4 pm
Meeting Rooms, Getty Villa


In antiquity, Sicily was an important island at the crossroads of the Mediterranean, considered the home of fascinating and dangerous beings—and even an access point to the Underworld! Explore with educator Shelby Brown the range of myths associated with this island, then visit the galleries to see mythological creatures and narratives in art. Complements the exhibition Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome. Course fee $30.


Tours and Gallery Talks
Getty Villa Inner Peristyle
Architecture Tour
Daily
10:30 am, 11:30 am, 12:30 pm, 1:30 pm, 2:30 pm, 3:30 pm
Museum, Getty Villa


Explore the architecture of the Getty Villa and learn more about daily life in the ancient world in this 40-minute tour. Meet at the Tour Meeting Place outside the Museum Entrance.

Getty Villa Outer Peristyle
Garden Tour
Sundays
10:30 am, 11:30 am, 12:30 pm, 1:30 pm, 2:30 pm, 3:30 pm
Getty Villa


Discover the rich mythological and cultural connections of ancient gardens in this 40-minute tour of the Getty Villa's four Roman gardens. Meet at the Tour Meeting Place outside the Museum Entrance.

Exhibitions
Molten Color
Molten Color: Glassmaking in Antiquity
Daily

Museum, Floor 2, Getty Villa


In 2003, the J. Paul Getty Museum acquired a collection of over 350 pieces of ancient glass, formerly owned by Erwin Oppenländer. The works on view in Molten Color are remarkable for their high quality, their chronological breadth, and the glassmaking techniques illustrated by their manufacture. The vessels are accompanied by text and videos illustrating ancient glassmaking techniques.

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Sicily: Between Greece and Rome
Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome
Daily through August 19, 2013

Museum, Floor 2, Getty Villa


Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome presents masterpieces of ancient art from the crossroads of the Mediterranean. On the island dear to Demeter and blessed with agricultural abundance, former Greek colonies emerged as powerful kingdoms during the fifth to third centuries B.C. Innovations in art, architecture, theater, poetry, philosophy, and science flourished, leaving an enduring stamp on mainland Greece and later on Rome. Over 150 objects bear witness to the athletic and military victories, religious rituals, opulent lifestyles, and intellectual attainments that shaped Classical culture at its peak.

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Lion attacking a Horse from the Capitoline Museums, Rome
Lion Attacking a Horse from the Capitoline Museums, Rome
Daily through May 6, 2013

Museum, Floor 1, Getty Villa


Among the most storied works of art to survive from antiquity, the spectacular Lion Attacking a Horse was created in the era of Alexander the Great. A trophy of war in imperial Rome, then a symbol of justice in the medieval city, this image of savage animal combat was admired by Michelangelo and inspired generations of artists. On the Capitoline Hill, its presence heralded the Renaissance spirit, laying the foundation for the world’s first public art collection. The extraordinary loan of this recently conserved marble group, presented in a special installation at the Getty Villa, signals a new partnership between the J. Paul Getty Museum and the civic museums of Rome.

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Relief with Antiochos and Herakles
Relief with Antiochos and Herakles
Daily through May 4, 2015

Museum, Floor 2, Getty Villa


On loan from the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, a stele honoring Prokleides, a military officer in the Athenian army, is on view at the Getty Villa in a gallery (208) devoted to Religious Offerings. Carved in relief above a public decree are figures of Antiochos, the mythical founder of the tribe Antiochis, and his father, the Greek hero Herakles.

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