Future Exhibitions and Installations

The Getty Center

  • Concrete Poetry: Words and Sounds in Graphic Space

    March 28–July 30, 2017

    Drawn principally from the Getty Research Institute's collection of prints, artists' books, journals, and manuscripts documenting the international concrete poetry movement, this exhibition focuses on the visual, verbal, and sonic experiments of the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. Featuring works by foundational figures Augusto de Campos and Ian Hamilton Finlay, Concrete Poetry explores how these artists invented new forms such as cube poems and standing poems and continuously re-created their projects across media. Poetry by contemporaries including Henri Chopin, Ernst Jandl, Mary Ellen Solt, and Emmett Williams also plays a prominent role.

  • Berlin / Los Angeles: Space for Music

    April 25–July 30, 2017

    Berlin / Los Angeles: Space for Music celebrates the 50th anniversary of the sister-city partnership between Berlin and Los Angeles by exploring two iconic buildings: the Berlin Philharmonic (1963), designed by Hans Scharoun, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall (2003) in Los Angeles, designed by Frank Gehry. Both buildings have captured the public's imagination and become signature features of the urban landscape of each city. Focusing on the buildings' extraordinary interiors, this exhibition brings together original drawings, sketches, prints, photographs, and models to convey each architect's design process. Berlin / Los Angeles demonstrates how the Berlin Philharmonic and the Walt Disney Concert Hall were pivotal in fostering a strong resonance between architecture and the city.

  • The Lure of Italy: Artists' Views

    May 9–July 30, 2017

    From the crumbling ruins of ancient Rome to the crystal clear light of Venice, Italy has fascinated travelers and artists for centuries. Painters and draftsmen have found inspiration not only in the cities but also in the countryside and in the deep history and culture. Visiting from France, England, the Netherlands, and Germany, artists drew sketches to preserve vivid memories, creating works of extraordinary atmosphere and beauty. Their Italian counterparts responded to the tourist demand for souvenirs by crafting their own masterpieces. Featuring works from the Getty Museum’s collection by R. P. Bonington, Claude Lorrain, Giovanni Battista Lusieri, and Canaletto, this exhibition captures the essence and spirit of Italy.

  • Eyewitness Views: Making History in Eighteenth-Century Europe

    May 9–July 30, 2017

    From Paris to Madrid and Vienna to London, from the Doge's Palace to St. Peter’s Square, Europe’s most iconic cities and monuments have played host to magnificent ceremonies. During the golden age of view painting in the eighteenth century, princes, popes, and ambassadors commissioned artists such as Canaletto and Panini to record memorable moments ranging from the Venetian carnival to an eruption of Vesuvius. This first-ever exhibition focusing on views of historic events includes over fifty works, many never seen before in America. Turning the beholder into an eyewitness on the scene, these paintings bring the spectacle and drama of the past to life.

  • Thomas Annan: Photographer of Glasgow

    May 23–August 13, 2017

    During the rise of industry in nineteenth-century Scotland, Thomas Annan ranked as the preeminent photographer in Glasgow. Best known for his haunting images of tenements on the verge of demolition—often considered precursors of the documentary tradition in photography—he prodigiously recorded the people, the social landscape, and the built environment of Glasgow and its outskirts for more than twenty-five years. This exhibition is the first to survey his industrious career and legacy as photographer and printer.

  • Now Then: Chris Killip and the Making of In Flagrante

    May 23–August 13, 2017

    Poetic, penetrating, and often heartbreaking, Chris Killip’s In Flagrante remains the most important photobook to document the devastating impact of deindustrialization on working-class communities in northern England in the 1970s and 1980s. Comprising fifty photographs—all drawn from the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum—In Flagrante serves as the foundation of this exhibition, which includes maquettes, contact sheets, and work prints that reveal the artist’s process. Now Then also showcases material from two related projects—Seacoal and Skinningrove—that Killip developed in the 1980s, featured selectively in In Flagrante, and revisited decades later.

  • The Birth of Pastel

    June 6–December 17, 2017

    This installation explores the evolution of pastel paintings out of colored chalk drawings from the Renaissance to the Rococo. Featuring works by Jacopo Bassano, Federico Barocci, Simon Vouet, Robert Nanteuil, Joseph Vivien, Rosalba Carriera, and Maurice-Quentin de La Tour, the display focuses most closely on the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century, when pastels began to rival oils—in their variety of color, their high degree of finish, and even their scale—as the preferred medium for stately portraits.

  • Illuminating Women in the Medieval World

    June 20–September 17, 2017

    From damsels in distress to powerful patrons, from the Virgin Mary to the adulterous Bathsheba, a wide variety of female figures populated the pages of medieval manuscripts. Virtuous women such as biblical heroines, steadfast saints, and pious nuns were held up as models for proper behavior, while lascivious women were warnings against sinful conduct. Female figures fulfilled the romantic role of lovers, the social and political function of wives, and the nurturing capacity of mothers. They were also creators of manuscripts, as women of great wealth and high status exercised their authority and influence by commissioning books—and sometimes even illuminating them.

  • Happy Birthday, Mr. Hockney

    June 27–November 26, 2017

    To celebrate David Hockney’s eightieth birthday and his long and continuing artistic career, this exhibition features one of his most renowned photo works, Pearblossom Hwy., 11–18th April 1986, #2, along with a number of composite Polaroids that mark his photographic explorations of the 1980s. The show also includes a selection of highly creative self-portraits made in different media over the last sixty-five years, on loan from the David Hockney Foundation.

  • Photography in Argentina, 1850–2010: Contradiction and Continuity

    September 16, 2017–January 28, 2018

    From its independence in 1810 until the economic crisis of 2001, Argentina has been perceived as a modern country with a powerful economic system, a massive European immigrant population, an especially strong middle class, and an almost nonexistent indigenous culture. This idea of a homogenous and progressive society underlines the difference between Argentina and its neighbors. Comprising three hundred works by sixty artists, this exhibition examines crucial periods and aesthetic movements in which photography had a critical role, producing—and, at times, dismantling—national constructions, utopian visions, and avant-garde artistic trends.

    This exhibition is part of the initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA.

  • The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930

    September 16, 2017–January 7, 2018

    Over the course of a century of rapid urban growth, sociopolitical upheavals and cultural transitions reshaped the architectural landscapes of major cities in Latin America. Focusing on six capitals—Buenos Aires, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, and Santiago de Chile—The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930, presents the colonial city as a terrain shaped by Iberian urban regulations, and the republican city as an arena of negotiation of previously imposed and newly imported models, which were later challenged by waves of indigenous revivals. Photographs, prints, plans, and maps depict the urban impact of key societal and economic transformations, including the emergence of a bourgeois elite, extensive infrastructure projects, rapid industrialization, and commercialization.


    Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA is a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles. Initiated through grants from the Getty Foundation, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA takes place from September 2017 through January 2018 at more than 60 cultural institutions across Southern California, from Los Angeles to Palm Springs, and from San Diego to Santa Barbara. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

  • Making Art Concrete: Works from Argentina and Brazil in the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

    September 16, 2017–February 11, 2018

    Combining art historical and scientific analysis, experts from the Getty Conservation Institute and Getty Research Institute have collaborated with the Coleccin Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, to examine the formal strategies and material choices of avant-garde painters and sculptors in Argentina and Brazil associated with the concrete art movement. These works of geometric abstraction, created between 1946 and 1962, are presented alongside information on how the artists pioneered new techniques and materials.

    This exhibition is part of the initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA.

  • Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas

    September 16, 2017–January 28, 2018

    Golden Kingdoms, a major international loan exhibition featuring more than 250 masterpieces, traces the development of luxury arts in the Americas from about 1000 BC to the arrival of Europeans in the early sixteenth century. Recent investigation into the historical, cultural, social, and political conditions under which such works were produced and circulated has led to new ways of thinking about materials, luxury, and the visual arts from a global perspective.

    This exhibition is part of the initiative Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA.

  • Giovanni Bellini: Landscapes of Faith in Renaissance Venice

    October 10, 2017–January 14, 2018

    This exhibition offers a unique opportunity to experience masterpieces by Giovanni Bellini (about 1430–1516), one of the greatest Venetian painters of the Renaissance. Landscape played a prominent role throughout his long and illustrious career, complementing his religious subject matter and enhancing the meditational nature of paintings intended for the private devotion of highly sophisticated patrons. Distinguished by a refined sensitivity to the natural world, Bellini transformed traditional symbolic motifs into convincing yet poetic depictions of the Venetian mainland, marking the beginning of a new chapter in the history of European painting.

  • Sacred Landscapes: Nature in Renaissance Manuscripts

    October 10, 2017–January 14, 2018

    Green spaces have a universal appeal. Nature's majesty is evident in gardens, farmlands, and especially the untamed wilderness. In Renaissance Europe, many people looked to greenery within the walls of the city and beyond for inspiration and to guide their contemplation of the perceived divine order of creation. Manuscript illuminators were among those who carefully studied the raw elements of nature—such as rocks, trees, flowers, waterways, mountains, and even atmosphere—and incorporated these into luxurious objects of personal or communal devotion.

  • Finding Form

    November 14, 2017–February 11, 2018

    Line by line and layer by layer, an artist conjures a three-dimensional world from a two-dimensional sheet of paper. Through an array of media and techniques—hatched ink lines, varying densities of wash, white chalk highlights—these draftsmen generate form, likeness, and depth, yielding an arresting presence. Featuring celebrated masterworks from the 1500s to the 1800s, all from the Getty's permanent collection, this focused exhibition demonstrates how artists have performed this magic across time and place.

  • Earthly Paradise: Medieval Journeys Connecting India and Europe

    January 30–April 29, 2018

    The pages of medieval manuscripts reveal a dynamically interconnected world filled with real and imagined ideas about foreign peoples and places. Buddhists, Muslims, and Christians living across Europe and Asia conceived paradise as a place of perfect harmony, but the path for locating such a site or achieving this state of mind varied between these religions. By exploring the terrestrial and celestial realms, this exhibition highlights the spiritual motivations for creating and owning portable and devotional artworks.

  • Cut! Paper Play in Contemporary Photography

    February 27–May 27, 2018

    Interaction with paper plays an integral role in the practice of many photographers working today. Some create paper models with images gleaned from current news, popular magazines, or the internet for the express purpose of photographing them. Others cut, layer, fold, and/or assemble representational photographs to introduce tactile or narrative elements. The exhibition features works by Thomas Demand, Christiane Feser, Daniel Gordon, Soo Kim, Matt Lipps, and Christopher Russell.

  • Paper Promises: Early American Photography

    February 27–May 27, 2018

    Paper Promises demonstrates the importance of photographic reproduction in shaping and circulating perceptions of America and its people during a critical period of political tension and territorial expansion. The exhibition traces mid-nineteenth-century experimentation with and exploitation of photography on paper, chronicling the ways in which concern about manipulation and duplication of paper photographs became tempered by enthusiasm for the social connectivity they offered. Rare photographs and negatives are featured alongside iconic images from the formative years of photography in the United States.

  • Rembrandt and the Inspiration of India

    March 13–June 24, 2018

    One of the most intriguing series in Rembrandt's oeuvre comprises his drawings made in the style of artists serving the Mughal court in India. Juxtaposing Rembrandt's depictions of Mughal rulers and courtiers with Indian paintings and drawings of similar compositions, this exhibition reveals how contact with Mughal art inspired Rembrandt to draw in an entirely different, refined style prompted by his curiosity for a foreign culture.

  • Egypt–Greece–Rome: Cultures in Contact

    March 27–September 9, 2018

    Egypt, the most ancient of the Mediterranean civilizations, held a great fascination for the Greeks and Romans. This major international loan exhibition explores the artistic interplay between these cultures from the Bronze Age to Roman times (2000 BC–AD 300). The installation includes royal Egyptian stone vessels sent to Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece, Archaic Greek pottery and sculpture inspired by Egyptian models, superb portraits in Egyptian and Greek style created during Greek rule in Egypt, and remarkable religious images and luxury goods in made for Roman patrons in Italy.

  • In Focus: Expressions

    May 22–October 7, 2018

    The human face has been the subject of fascination for photographers since the medium’s inception. This exhibition includes posed portraits, physiognomic studies, anonymous snapshots, and unsuspecting countenances caught by the camera’s eye, offering a close-up look at the range of human stories that facial expressions—and photographs—can tell.

  • Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911–2011

    June 26–October 21, 2018

    This exhibition surveys the rich and varied history of modern fashion photography, exploring the ways in which photographers whose careers have been closely associated with the industry have shaped evolving notions of style and beauty. Drawn from the Getty Museum's permanent collection and supplemented by loans from private and public sources, Icons of Style features more than two hundred photographs presented alongside a selection of costumes, illustrations, magazine covers, videos, and advertisements.

The Getty Villa

  • Roman Mosaics across the Empire

    June 9, 2017–January 8, 2018

    Roman decor was unique for the elaborate mosaic floors that transformed entire rooms into spectacular settings of vibrant color, figural imagery, and geometric design. Scenes from mythology, daily life, the natural world, and spectacles in the arena enlivened interior spaces and reflected the cultural ambitions of wealthy patrons. Drawn primarily from the Getty Museum's collection, this exhibition presents the artistry of mosaics as well as the contexts of their discovery across Rome's expanding empire—from its center in Italy to provinces in North Africa, southern Gaul, and ancient Syria.