Future Exhibitions and Installations

The Getty Center

  • Flight of Fancy: The Galle Chandelier

    April 9, 2019–April 19, 2020

    This display provides an in-depth look at a French chandelier made by the bronze caster and gilder Gérard-Jean Galle in about 1818–19. Resembling a hot-air balloon, the chandelier is a work of extreme novelty that includes the signs of the zodiac and a glass bowl intended to hold water for small goldfish. Following contemporary taste, Galle adapted motifs found in ancient art to new forms of furniture creating an intriguing object that was thoroughly modern for its time.

  • The Wondrous Cosmos in Medieval Manuscripts

    April 30–July 21, 2019

    The cosmos—full of shining stars and orbiting planets—inspired study and devotion among scientists, theologians, and artists alike during the Middle Ages. The belief in angels, demons, and spirits moreover materialized in wondrous works of art, especially on the pages of illuminated manuscripts. Awe-inspiring cosmic phenomena informed every aspect of one’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being in the premodern world. This exhibition invites you to explore the complexity of the celestial realm in medieval European faith and science traditions.

  • Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World

    May 14–August 18, 2019

    A vast throng of animals tumble, soar, and race through the pages of the bestiary, a popular medieval book describing the beasts of the world. Abounding with vibrant and fascinating images, the bestiary brought creatures to life before the eyes of readers. The beasts also often escaped from its pages to inhabit a glittering array of other objects. With over 100 works on display, this major loan exhibition will transport visitors into the world of the medieval bestiary.

  • Reading between the Lines: Drawing Illustrations

    June 4–September 15, 2019

    The illustration of written texts has provided artists with inspiration, and gainful employment, across the centuries. Presenting some of the most beautifully finished drawings and watercolors in the Getty collection, this exhibition explores illustration as a branch of artistic production in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

  • Bauhaus Beginnings

    June 11–October 13, 2019

    The Bauhaus was a German school of art and design whose brief yet highly influential existence rendered it a key site in the development of a new modern vision for arts education. Established in 1919 after the end of World War I, the Bauhaus sought to erode distinctions between crafts and the fine arts through a program of study centered on theory and practical experience.

    Marking the 100th anniversary of the school's opening, Bauhaus Beginnings investigates the school's early commitment to spiritual expression, its innovative first-year curriculum, and its use of diverse media to introduce the work of students and masters to international audiences. The exhibition draws on the Getty Research Institute's extensive collection of Bauhaus material—including course exercises, teaching aids and notes, and rare prints, drawings, and photographs—to offer a colorful and surprising reexamination of the founding principles of this landmark institution.

  • Bauhaus: Building the New Artist

    June 11, 2019–Ongoing

    Coming June 11, 2019

    Considered one of the most influential schools of art and design of the 20th century, the Bauhaus forged a unique educational vision that blended theory with practice in order to cultivate a new generation of artists and designers.

    Conceived in tandem with the Getty Research Institute's gallery exhibition, the online exhibition Bauhaus: Building the New Artist offers an in-depth look into the school's novel pedagogy. Highlighting student explorations, masters' theories, and a variety of colorful media drawn from the GRI's archives, the project culminates with three interactive exercises inviting viewers to immerse themselves in surprising aspects of Bauhaus curriculum.

The Getty Villa

  • Buried by Vesuvius: Treasures from the Villa dei Papiri

    June 26–October 27, 2019

    The Getty Villa is modeled on the Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum. Buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79, the ancient villa was rediscovered and explored by subterranean tunnels in the 1750s and '60s and was partially re-excavated in the 1990s and early 2000s. It has yielded spectacular colored marble and mosaic floors, frescoed walls, a large collection of bronze and marble statuary, and a library of more than a thousand papyrus scrolls. This exhibition presents rare original artifacts and traces attempts to unroll and decipher the carbonized papyri.