Duration


No work of art, however enduring, can be literally timeless. Stone crumbles; pigments fade; paint cracks and flakes; buildings rot and collapse. The gardens of Le Nôtre as much as Robert Rauschenberg's Grass Painting, the latex sculptures of Eva Hesse no less than a vernacular shingle cottage in New England—all exist within a process of growth or decay rather than as completed, unchangeable objects. The temporal dimension of art and architecture extends from evanescence to apparent endlessness. Recent trends in sophisticated art practices have emphasized duration in spectatorship, inviting the interaction of viewers and incorporating their movements through space. In dance, music, theater, film, and the novel, an unfolding over time has always been their essence; and increasing attention is being paid to the historical imprint of such temporal art forms on the creation and experience of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

In 2004-2005, the GRI focuses on the concept of duration and welcomes applications from researchers in the arts, humanities, and social and natural sciences whose projects bear upon the problem of duration in the visual arts. Conservators who have an interest in theoretical aspects of this topic are also invited to apply; projects may entail use of a Getty conservation laboratory. Scholars in residence will find that the special collections of the Research Library are especially rich in primary materials that bear directly on this issue, ranging from early-modern texts on the art of fireworks to the papers of the contemporary concrete poet and garden designer Ian Hamilton Finlay, from rare books and prints that document the arts of courtly festivals to the archives of happenings artist Allan Kaprow, from the papers of Viollet-le-Duc and early photographs of archaeological sites across the world to documents of Fluxus activities in the collection of Jean Brown.

Getty Scholars


Timothy Barringer is an associate professor of the history of art at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. 
Art and Music in Britain, from the Gothic Revival to Punk
(September – June)

Howard Bloch is the Augustus R. Street Professor of French at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.
Narration and Duration in the Bayeux Tapestry
(September – June)

Robert Haywood is an assistant professor of modern and contemporary art and criticism at the University of Notre Dame in Notre Dame, Indiana.
Critique of the Museum in Contemporary Art
(September – June)

Joan Landes is Ferree Professor of Early Modern History and Women's Studies at the Pennsylvania State University in University Park, Pennsylvania and is currently serving as Past-President of the American Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies.
Artificial Life in 18th-Century France
(September – June)

Sylvia Lavin is chair of the department of architecture and urban design at the University of California, Los Angeles. 
The Showroom of the Contemporary
(September – June)

Thomas Levin is an associate professor and director of graduate studies in the department of Germanic languages and literatures at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. 
Figures of Duration: Media and/as Temporal Inscription
(September – June)

Peggy Phelan is the Ann O'Day Maples Chair in the Arts at Stanford University in Stanford, California.
Duration, Repetition, and Dying: The Performances of Andy Warhol and Ronald Reagan
(September – June)

P. Adams Sitney is professor of the visual arts in the Council of the Humanities at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey.
Macrotemporality and Cinematic Sequences
(September – June)


Visiting Scholars


René Démoris is professor emeritus of 18th-Century French literature at the Université de Paris III — Sorbonne Nouvelle.
(May – June)

Georges Didi-Huberman is an art historian and professor at the Ecole des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris, France.
Rhythms of Duration, Colors of Duration
(April – June)

Martha Gever is an assistant professor of media and cultural studies at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida.
The New Me: Make-Over Television and Transformed Selves
(April – June)

George Herms is an assemblage artist based in Los Angeles, California.
(January – June)

Joan Jonas is an artist based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
(January – March)

Edward Harwood is an associate professor of art at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine.
Hermitages in 18th-Century Landscape Gardens
(September – December)

Grant Kester is an associate professor of art history in the department of visual arts at the University of California, San Diego.
Duration and Performativity: The Aesthetics of Collaboration
(September – December)

Rebecca Leydon is an associate professor of music theory at the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music in Oberlin, Ohio.
Negotiating the "Audio-Visual Contract": Musical Continuity and Succession in the Era of Cinema
(January – March)

Tan Lin is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at the New Jersey City University in Jersey City, New Jersey.
Warhol: Boredom and the Temporality of Recording
(September – December)

Philippe-Alain Michaud is a film curator at the Musée national d'art moderne—Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, France.
Expanded History of Cinema
(April – June)

Marcia Pointon is professor emerita at the University of Manchester, United Kingdom.
Stories Touching Stones: Spectacle and the Transvaluation of Jewels, 1700–1900
(January – March)

Alex Potts is the Max Loehr Collegiate Professor of the History of Art and chair of the department of the history of art at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Between Commitment and Consumerism: Art in Postwar Europe and America
(January – March)

Yvonne Rainer is a filmmaker and choreographer based in New York City.
(April – June)

Klaus Rinke is an artist based in Dusseldorf, Germany.
(September – December)

Jeffrey Schnapp is the Rosina Pierotti Chair in Italian Literature at Stanford University in Stanford, California.
Crash (An Anthropology of Speed)
(April – June)



Predoctoral Fellows


Carolyn Nakamura is a PhD candidate in anthropology at Columbia University in New York.
The Matter of Magic: Materiality, Representation and Space in Neo-Assyrian Apotropaic Figurine Rituals
(September – June)

Vimalin Rujivacharakul is a PhD candidate in architecture at the University of California, Berkeley.
From Anyang to Shanghai (by Way of London and Paris)
(September – June)

Minou Schraven is a PhD candidate in the history of art and architecture at the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen in Groningen, The Netherlands.
Festive Funerals: The Art and Liturgy of Conspicuous Commemoration in Early-Modern Rome
(September – June)

Michael Schreyach is a PhD candidate in the history of art at the University of California, Berkeley.
Painting Pragmatically: Reflexivity and Temporality in Hans Hofmann and Jackson Pollock
(September – December)



Postdoctoral Fellows


Sarah Adams received her PhD in the history of art from Yale University in 2002 and is an assistant professor of art and art history at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa.
Hand to Hand: Artistic Identity and "African" Art
(January – June)

Elizabeth Kotz received her PhD in comparative literature from Columbia University in 2002.  She is an assistant professor in the department of cultural studies and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, in Minneapolis.
Toward a Genealogy of Durational Structures
(September – June)

Carrie Lambert-Beatty received her PhD in art history from Stanford University in 2002 and is an assistant professor of history of art and architecture and visual and environmental studies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
"The Seeing Difficulty": Yvonne Rainer and American Art in the 1960s
(September – June)



Museum Guest Scholars


Cheryl Meszaros is head of public programs and senior manager at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Canada.
(July – September)

John McElhone is conservator of photographs, National Gallery of Canada.
(July – September)

Alexander V. Kruglov is senior curator of sculpture at the State Hermitage Museum, Russia.
(October – December)

Joseph Rishel is the Gisela and Dennis Alter Senior Curator of European Painting & Sculpture before 1900 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
(October – December)

Jon Whiteley is the senior assistant keeper in the Ashmolean Museum at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
(October – December)

Paul F. Miller is the chief curator at the Preservation Society of Newport County, Rhode Island.
(January – March)

Elizabeth Darrow is an independent scholar based in Montana.
(April – June)

Antonín Dufek is the chief curator of the department of photography at the Moravian Gallery, Czech Republic
(April – June)

Mary Rouse is the former managing editor of Viator: Medieval and Renaissance Studies. She is based in Los Angeles.
(April – June)