Library Catalog
 



Events


 
 
 
Lecture
Why We Need Ruskin Now
December 10, 2019






Upcoming Exhibition


 
Käthe Kollwitz: Prints, Process, Politics
December 3, 2019–March 29, 2020

Käthe Kollwitz, one of the foremost graphic artists of the 20th century, is celebrated for her affecting portrayals of the hardships of war, poverty, and injustice and for her technical virtuosity. A selection of works on paper from the Dr. Richard A. Simms Collection at the Getty Research Institute—including rare preparatory drawings, working proofs, and trial prints—sheds light on Kollwitz's creative process and reveals the depth of her social and political engagement.

Image: Figure adapted from The Black Anna, Käthe Kollwitz, 1903. Pencil with white and orange highlights on gray-brown laid paper. Dr. Richard A. Simms Collection. The Getty Research Institute, 2016.PR.34


Online Exhibitions


 
Bauhaus: Building the New Artist
ONLINE ONLY

Considered one of the most influential schools of art and design of the 20th century, the Bauhaus forged a unique educational vision that blended theory with practice in order to cultivate a new generation of artists and designers.

Conceived in tandem with the Getty Research Institute's gallery exhibition, the online exhibition Bauhaus: Building the New Artist offers an in-depth look into the school's novel pedagogy. Highlighting student explorations, masters' theories, and a variety of colorful media drawn from the GRI's archives, the project culminates with three interactive exercises inviting viewers to immerse themselves in surprising aspects of Bauhaus curriculum.

 
The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra
ONLINE ONLY

War in Syria has irrevocably changed the ancient caravan city of Palmyra, famed as a meeting place of civilizations since its apogee in the mid-2nd to 3rd century CE. The Romans and Parthians knew Palmyra as a wealthy oasis metropolis, a center of culture and trade on the edge of their empires. For centuries, traveling artists and explorers have documented the site in former states of preservation. This online exhibition captures the site as it was photographed for the first time by Louis Vignes in 1864 and illustrated in the 18th century by the architect Louis-François Cassas. Their works contribute to Palmyra's legacy, one that goes far beyond the stones of its once great buildings.

Image: Temple of Bel, cella entrance (detail), Jean Baptiste Réville and Pierre Gabriel Berthault after Louis-François Cassas, 1799. From Voyage pittoresque de la Syrie, de la Phoénicie, de la Palestine, et de la Basse Egypte (Paris, 1799), vol. 1, pl. 46. The Getty Research Institute, 840011