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Current Exhibition


 
World War I: War of Images, Images of War
November 18, 2014–April 19, 2015
Getty Research Institute Galleries I and II

World War I: War of Images, Images of War examines the art and visual culture of the First World War—a conflict of unprecedented mechanized slaughter as well as a struggle over the cultural dominance and direction of Europe.

The exhibition juxtaposes the representation of the war in visual propaganda with its depiction by artists who experienced the brutality firsthand. Drawing principally from the Getty Research Institute's special collections, the exhibition features a range of satirical journals, prints, posters, and photographs as well as accounts from the front, including a war diary, correspondence, and "trench art" made by soldiers. Through such archival and graphic material, World War I: War of Images, Images of War captures the trauma of this first modern war.


Events


 
 
Panel Discussion
Reconsidering Harald Szeemann
May 28, 2015






 
Storytelling and Book Signing
An Afternoon Adventure with Cornelia Funke
June 21, 2015






Upcoming Exhibitions


 
A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715
June 16–September 6, 2015
Getty Research Institute Galleries I and II

From grand royal portraits to satiric views of everyday life, and from small-scale fashion prints decorated with actual fabrics to monumental panoramas of Versailles and the Louvre, this exhibition explores the rich variety of prints that came to define French power and prestige in the era of Louis XIV (1638–1715). During the Sun King's long reign, printmakers and publishers effectively deployed prints to promote French culture, art, and style. Commemorating the 300th anniversary of Louis XIV's death, A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715 features nearly 100 works from the Getty Research Institute and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

Image caption: Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre (detail), Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard, 1661. The Getty Research Institute, 2010.PR.60


 
The Edible Monument: The Art of Food for Festivals
October 13, 2015–March 13, 2016
Getty Research Institute Galleries I and II

Elaborate artworks made of food were created for royal court and civic celebrations in early modern Europe. Like today's Rose Bowl Parade on New Year's Day or Mardi Gras just before Lent, festivals were times for exuberant parties. Public celebrations and street parades featured large-scale edible monuments made of breads, cheeses, and meats. At court festivals, banquet settings and dessert buffets featured magnificent table monuments with heraldic and emblematic themes made of sugar, flowers, and fruit. This exhibition, drawn from the Getty Research Institute's Festival Collection, features rare books and prints, including early cookbooks and serving manuals that illustrate the methods and materials for making edible monuments.

Image caption: Three-tiered pastry, Conrad Hagger, 1719. From Neues saltzburgisches Koch-Buch. The Getty Research Institute, 1554–451