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THE GETTY ANNOUNCES APPOINTMENT OF CURATOR TO HEAD NEWLY MERGED DEPARTMENT OF SCULPTURE AND DECORATIVE ARTS

July 19, 2004

LOS ANGELES—Following an international search, the Getty has announced the appointment of ANTONIA BOSTRÖM as curator of sculpture and decorative arts at the J. Paul Getty Museum. She will assume her new post in the fall of 2004, overseeing the newly combined departments of sculpture and decorative arts, with responsibility for creating an integrated, cohesive approach to building and exhibiting the Getty's holdings of sculpture, furniture, and decorative arts.

 Ms. Boström comes to the Getty with more than 20 years of experience, having held curatorial positions in the United Kingdom at the National Portrait Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the Royal Academy of Arts. She has been at the Detroit Institute of Arts since 1996, most recently as associate curator of European sculpture and decorative arts in the department of European art. Ms. Boström received her Ph.D. from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, focusing on the collection and display of sculpture in Florence and Rome in the 16th century. Her areas of specialty also include European art of the 15th through 17th centuries, and she has an interest in issues of artistic patronage. She played a crucial role in the recent major international exhibition Magnificenza! The Medici, Michelangelo, and the Art of Late Renaissance Florence, which was presented in Florence, Chicago, and Detroit.

 "We are delighted to welcome Antonia to the Getty," says Deborah Gribbon, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum and vice president of the J. Paul Getty Trust. "She is an experienced curator, a thoughtful scholar, and just the right person to usher in an exciting new phase in the history of the Museum's collections of sculpture and decorative arts."

 At the Getty, Ms. Boström will manage a rich collection of works dating from the 16th through 19th centuries, covering both northern and southern Europe, with a strong focus on Renaissance bronzes and 19th-century neoclassical sculpture; 18th-century French furniture; and French, German, and Italian Renaissance ceramics. Building the collection of sculpture in particular will be a major priority. Her other duties will include collection installation, research, publication, and documentation. She will also participate in the development of exhibitions and educational programs for the general public. 
 
 Under her leadership, the department of sculpture and works of art and the department of decorative arts, previously separate entities, will be combined to develop a more unified approach to collecting and presenting works from both areas. The collection of decorative arts has its roots in J. Paul Getty's exceptional holdings of 18th-century French furniture, which he began collecting in the 1930s. It was further developed by Gillian Wilson, curator of decorative arts from 1971 to 2002, and is today a world-renowned holding of French furniture and decorative arts. The department of sculpture and works of art was formed in 1983 and encompasses European sculpture before 1900 as well as Italian and northern decorative arts. Longtime Curator of Sculpture Peter Fusco retired in 2000, and since then, Scott Schaefer, curator of paintings, has also been acting curator of sculpture. 
 
 "I am thrilled and honored to accept this position," says Ms. Boström. "The Getty Museum is a vital, world-class institution with marvelous collections. The integration of the collection, interpretation, and display of sculpture and decorative arts poses exciting challenges and opportunities, and I look forward to working with my new colleagues."

 In addition to her curating experience, Ms. Boström is also widely published as an author and editor. She has contributed to numerous publications including The Burlington and Apollo magazines and The Sculpture Journal. She is editor of The Encyclopedia of Sculpture published by Fitzroy Dearborn, was an area commissioning editor for The Grove Dictionary of Art at Macmillan Publishers, and is one of the co-authors of the Catalogue of Italian Sculpture in the Detroit Institute of Arts published by Harvey Miller Publishers. A noted researcher in her field, Ms. Boström has lectured widely at conferences in the United Kingdom and across the U.S., and has taught at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London and conducted undergraduate tours at the Detroit Institute of Arts for Wayne State University. 

 She is a member of the College Art Association, the Association of Art Museum Curators, the Association of Mid–West Art Historians, the Society for Renaissance Studies, the Garden History Society, Preservation Wayne, and Pewabic Pottery, and she was on the editorial board of The Sculpture Journal (London; 1995–2000). Among her awards are the Henry Moore scholarship, presented through the Courtauld Institute of Art, and the Elfrida Manning prize for the study of sculpture.

Note to editors:  Image available on request.

MEDIA CONTACT:            
Magdalene Sim
Getty Communications Dept.
310-440-7274
msim@getty.edu

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About the Getty:

The J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic institution devoted to the visual arts that features the Getty Conservation Institute, the Getty Foundation, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Getty Research Institute. The J. Paul Getty Trust and Getty programs serve a varied audience from two locations: the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Malibu.

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The J. Paul Getty Museum collects in seven distinct areas, including Greek and Roman antiquities, European paintings, drawings, manuscripts, sculpture, and decorative arts, and European and American photographs. The Museum's mission is to make the collection meaningful and attractive to a broad audience by presenting and interpreting the works of art through educational programs, special exhibitions, publications, conservation, and research.