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Getty Research Institute Raises The Curtain On Its Fall Lineup

Markets and Value Film Series Focuses on Film and Video's Impact on Art

Modern Art in Los Angeles Looks at Vibrant West Coast Beat Era Scene

September 26, 2003

Los Angeles—The Getty Research Institute (GRI) announces its fall program lineup, which includes the premiere of its Markets and Value film series, as well as exciting new programming for its ongoing Modern Art in Los Angeles project. Both programs begin in October and continue through spring 2004.

The GRI's Markets and Value film series features six film and video programs that investigate the role film and video play in how aesthetic and economic values are assigned to art.  The first screening, presented by Artists on Film Trust, is a survey of documentary films and videos featuring artists such as Monet, Renoir, and Picasso, as well as contemporary artists whose savvy use of media often influences the value of their works. Subsequent screenings include Roger Corman's 1959 cult classic Bucket of Blood with a personal appearance by Corman himself, and Chi-hwa-seon (2002) by Cannes Best Director-winner Im Kwon-Taek. Additional screenings this spring, for which dates will be announced in the coming months, include a selection of video shorts featuring works by Nam June Paik, Richard Serra, and Alex Bag. The Getty will also screen Dreams That Money Can Buy (1948), featuring vignettes by Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Man Ray, and Hans Richter, as well as America's Pop Collector: Robert C. ScullContemporary Art At Auction.

GRI continues its popular Modern Art in Los Angeles series with two new programs for fall that look at the 1950s beat era on the West Coast. First up is Beat Film, a screening of films with a distinctly underground, bohemian sensibility that capture the beat state of mind. Following the screening Kenneth Anger, Curtis Harrington, and Larry Jordon, three of the era's leading filmmakers, will discuss their involvement in avant-garde cinema and its continuing legacy.  Beat Years, the second program, brings together assemblage sculptor George Herms, photographer Charles Brittin, and other artists of the era for a public conversation with curator Walter Hopps on the fusion of far Eastern metaphysics, the proximity of Hollywood, and the sublime coastal landscape that shaped the region’s contributions to postwar art.

Looking beyond fall and the opening of Walt Disney Concert Hall, GRI and the Los Angeles Philharmonic continue their collaboration on Building Music, a two-week festival held May 21–June 13, 2004, that celebrates and examines the relationships between music, visual art, and architecture. In addition to a series of concerts, lectures, and panel discussions, held at both the Getty Center and Walt Disney Concert Hall, the festival features the world premiere of a new work by composer Henry Brant.

All Markets and Value and Modern Art in Los Angeles events are free of charge. Event reservations are required and may be made by calling 310-440-7300 or by visiting the Getty Web site at www.getty.edu.

GRI FALL PROGRAMMING AT THE GETTY

Markets and Value: Artists on Film
Hannah Rothschild and Robert McNab, founders of the Artists on Film Trust in London, present and discuss a survey of documentary films and videos featuring artists.  Clips range from some of the earliest known film footage of artists such as Monet, Renoir, and Picasso to more contemporary artists, whose savvy use of media exposure often plays a role in establishing the value of their works.
Wednesday, October 15, 2003, 7:30 p.m.  Museum Lecture Hall

Modern Art in Los Angeles: Beat Film
Pioneering filmmakers Kenneth Anger, Curtis Harrington, and Larry Jordan present and discuss a selection of their films that capture the spirit of the West Coast Beat movement. Reservations for this event available beginning September 25 at 9 a.m.
Thursday, October 30, 2003, 7:30 p.m.  Harold M. Williams Auditorium

Modern Art in Los Angeles: The Beat Years
Artist George Herms, photographer Charles Brittin, curator Walter Hopps, and poet David Meltzer discuss the L.A. art scene of the mid and late 1950s, including the important interchange between L.A. and San Francisco and how California art distinguished itself from the art of the East Coast. Reservations for this event available beginning October 24 at 9 a.m.
Tuesday, November 18, 2003, 7:30 p.m.  Harold M. Williams Auditorium

Markets and Value Film Series: Bucket of Blood
Director Roger Corman appears in person to present his sly parody Bucket of Blood (1959).  The discussion will focus on the complex links between production, commercial, and aesthetic value of film. Reservations for this event available beginning November 25 at 9 a.m.
Wednesday, December 17, 2003, 7:30 p.m.  Harold M. Williams Auditorium

Markets and Value Film Series: Chi-hwa-seon (Painted Fire)
Im Kwon-Taek’s Chi-hwa-seon (Painted Fire) tells the story of Jang Seung-Up, one of Korea's most renowned and infamous painters. Insoo Cho, assistant professor of Korean art at USC, and David James, professor of critical studies at USC School of Cinema-Television, will present and discuss the award-winning 2002 film. Reservations for this event available beginning December 23 at 9:00 a.m.
Thursday, January 22, 2004, 7:30 p.m.  Harold M. Williams Auditorium

Building Music Festival
The world premiere of a new work by composer Henry Brant at the Getty Center is the highlight of this two-week festival (May 21-June 13) celebrating the relationships between music, visual art, and architecture. It features a series of lectures, concerts, and discussion panels held at the Getty Center and Walt Disney Concert Hall. Events held at the Getty Center include:

Symposium on Architecture, Music, and the Visual Arts
An international panel of scholars, artists, and architects will be featured in two panel discussions. The first looks at the historical context of signature architecture in the arts. The second examines the spatial relationships between the arts and architecture.
The Works of Henry Brant
The symposium culminates with a special evening concert featuring works by Henry Brant, including the world premiere of a commission written for the Getty Center.
Friday, June 4, 2004, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.


Note to Editors: For more information, the public can call 310-440-7300 or visit www.getty.edu.

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About the Getty:

The J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic institution devoted to the visual arts that features the Getty Conservation Institute, the Getty Foundation, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Getty Research Institute. The J. Paul Getty Trust and Getty programs serve a varied audience from two locations: the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Malibu.

Sign up for e-Getty at www.getty.edu/subscribe to receive free monthly highlights of events at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa via e-mail, or visit our event calendar for a complete calendar of public programs.

The Getty Research Institute is an operating program of the J. Paul Getty Trust. It serves education in the broadest sense by increasing knowledge and understanding about art and its history through advanced research. The Research Institute provides intellectual leadership through its research, exhibition, and publication programs and provides service to a wide range of scholars worldwide through residencies, fellowships, online resources, and a Research Library. The Research Library - housed in the 201,000-square-foot Research Institute building designed by Richard Meier - is one of the largest art and architecture libraries in the world. The general library collections (secondary sources) include almost 900,000 volumes of books, periodicals, and auction catalogues encompassing the history of Western art and related fields in the humanities. The Research Library's special collections include rare books, artists' journals, sketchbooks, architectural drawings and models, photographs, and archival materials.

Visiting the Getty Villa: The Getty Villa is open Wednesday through Monday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed Tuesday and major holidays. Admission to the Getty Villa is always free. A ticket is required for admission. Tickets can be ordered in advance, or on the day of your visit, at www.getty.edu/visit or at 310-440-7300. Parking is $15 per car, but free after 5pm for evening events. Groups of 15 or more must make reservations by phone. For more information, call 310-440-7300 (English or Spanish); 310-440-7305 (TTY line for the deaf or hearing impaired). The Getty Villa is at 17985 Pacific Coast Highway, Pacific Palisades, California.