The Getty A world of art, research, conservation, and philanthropy
Art Bound March 2014

Delight the Eye. Nourish the Mind.

Jackson Pollock's Mural
The Transitional Moment

Yvonne Szafran, Laura Rivers, Alan Phenix, Tom Learner, Ellen G. Landau,
and Steve Martin
  Jackson Pollock's Mural: The Transitional Moment

Jackson Pollock's (1912–1956) first large-scale painting, Mural, in many ways represents the birth of Pollock, the legend. The controversial artist's creation of this painting has been recounted in dozens of books and dramatized in the Oscar-winning film Pollock. Mural, painted in 1943, was Pollock's first major commission. It was made for the entrance hall of the Manhattan duplex of Peggy Guggenheim, who donated it to the University of Iowa in the 1950s where it stayed until its 2012 arrival for conservation and study at the Getty Center. This book unveils the findings of that examination, providing a more complete picture of Pollock's process than ever before. It includes an essay by eminent Pollock scholar Ellen G. Landau and an introduction by comedian Steve Martin. It accompanies an exhibition of the painting on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum through June 1, 2014.

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A Royal Passion
Queen Victoria and Photography

Anne M. Lyden
With contributions by Sophie Gordon and Jennifer Green-Lewis
  A Royal Passion: Queen Victoria and Photography

In January 1839, photography was announced to the world. Two years prior, a young Queen Victoria ascended to the throne of Great Britain and Ireland. These two events, while seemingly unrelated, marked the beginnings of a relationship that continued throughout the nineteenth century and helped construct the image of an entire age. This volume explores the connections between photography and the monarchy through Victoria's embrace of the new medium and her portrayal through the lens.

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The First Treatise on Museums Samuel Quiccheberg's Inscriptiones, 1565

Samuel Quiccheberg
Introduction by Mark A. Meadow
Translation by Mark A. Meadow and Bruce Robertson
  The First Treatise on Museums Samuel Quiccheberg's Inscriptiones, 1565

Samuel Quiccheberg's Inscriptiones, first published in Latin in 1565, is an ambitious effort to demonstrate the pragmatic value of curiosity cabinets, or Wunderkammern, to princely collectors in sixteenth-century Europe and, by so doing, inspire them to develop their own such collections. Quiccheberg shows how the assembly and display of physical objects offered nobles a powerful means to expand visual knowledge, allowing them to incorporate empirical and artisanal expertise into the realm of the written word. But in mapping out the collectability of the material world, Quiccheberg did far more than create a taxonomy. Rather, he demonstrated how organizing objects made their knowledge more accessible; how objects, when juxtaposed or grouped, could tell a story; and how such strategies could enhance the value of any single object.

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World Antiquarianism
Comparative Perspectives

Edited by Alain Schnapp
With Lothar von Falkenhausen, Peter N. Miller, and Tim Murray
  World Antiquarianism: Comparative Perspectives

The term antiquarianism refers to engagement with the material heritage of the past—an engagement that preceded the modern academic discipline of archaeology. This book is the first to compare antiquarianism in a global context, examining its roots in the ancient Near East, its flourishing in early modern Europe and East Asia, and its manifestations in nonliterate societies of Melanesia and Polynesia. By establishing wide-reaching geographical and historical perspectives, the essays reveal the universality of antiquarianism as an embodiment of the human mind and open new avenues for understanding the representation of the past, from ancient societies to the present.

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Conservation Practices on Archaeological Excavations
Principles and Methods

Corrado Pedelì and Stefano Pulga
Translated by Erik Risser
  Conservation Practices on Archaeological Excavations: Principles and Methods

The relationship between archaeology and conservation has long been complex and, at times, challenging. Archaeologists are often seen as interested principally in excavation and research, while conservators are concerned mainly with stabilization and the prevention of deterioration. Yet it is often initial conservation in the field that determines the long-term survival and intelligibility of both moveable artifacts and fixed architectural features. This user-friendly guide covers both structures and artifacts, starting from the moment when they are uncovered. Individual chapters discuss excavation and conservation, environmental and soil issues, deterioration, identification and condition assessment, detachment and removal, initial cleaning, coverings and shelters, packing, and documentation.

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The Conservation of Cave 85 at the Mogao Grottoes, Dunhuang
A Collaborative Project of the Getty Conservation Institute and the Dunhuang Academy

Edited by Lori Wong and Neville Agnew
  The Conservation of Cave 85 at the Mogao Grottoes, Dunhuang: A Collaborative Project of the Getty Conservation Institute and the Dunhuang Academy

The Mogao Grottoes, a World Heritage Site in northwestern China, are located along the ancient caravan routes—collectively known as the Silk Road—that once linked China with the West. Founded by a Buddhist monk in the late fourth century, Mogao flourished over the following millennium, as monks, local rulers, and travelers commissioned hundreds of cave temples cut into a mile-long rock cliff and adorned them with vibrant murals. More than 490 decorated grottoes remain, containing thousands of sculptures and some 45,000 square meters of wall paintings, making Mogao one of the world's most significant sites of Buddhist art. In 1997 the Getty Conservation Institute began a case study using the Late-Tang dynasty Cave 85 to develop a methodology that would stabilize the deteriorating wall paintings. This abundantly illustrated volume is the definitive report on the project.

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About Getty Publications
Getty Publications produces award-winning titles that result from or complement the work of the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Research Institute. This wide variety of books covers the fields of art, photography, archaeology, architecture, conservation, and the humanities for both the general public and specialists. Publications include illustrated works on artists and art history, exhibition catalogues, works on cultural history, research on the conservation of materials and archaeological sites, scholarly monographs, critical editions of translated works, comprehensive studies of the Getty's collections, and educational books on art to interest children of all ages.