Unique gallery courses explore the fascinating world of art and ideas found in the Museum's collection and current exhibitions. Participants have the opportunity for close encounters with art through lecture and guided discussion.

Courses are designed for adults and taught by educators, curators, and scholars. Registration and tickets are required for all courses.

Art Circles
The Getty Center


 
Enrich your Saturday nights. Join an open-ended discussion in the galleries to heighten your appreciation and understanding of the visual arts by exploring one masterpiece with an educator. The chosen work of art changes every session, making each visit a new experience. Course fee $25 per session (includes a food voucher and parking). Meet at the Museum Information Desk for course introduction.

Learn more about this program on our blog, The Iris.

Next in the series
A Masterpiece to Be Explored

Saturday, September 12, 2015
6:00–8:00 p.m.



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Exhibition-Related Courses
The Getty Center and The Getty Villa


Explore in depth the work of a featured artist or a stylistic movement related to a current exhibition. An educator presents an illustrated lecture, culminating with the guided viewing and discussion of art in the exhibition galleries.

 
The Getty Villa

Next in the series
Bad Women, Wives, and Witches

Saturday, October 3, 2015
1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Meeting Rooms and
Museum galleries
Course fee $35 (includes parking and refreshments)
For tickets call (310) 440-7300 or use the "Get Tickets" button below.



Investigate the bad women of ancient Greece with educator Shelby Brown. Consider the inappropriate behavior and misdeeds of both ordinary and magical women, from the merely shocking to actual mythological crimes. Then tour the galleries to see how artists depict good and bad women in art. (Relates to the fall Outdoor Classical Play based on Euripides' Medea (Luis Alfaro's Mojada: A Medea in Los Angeles).

 
The Getty Center

Recently in the series
Magnificence and Minerality: Art and Wine from Northern Italy

Saturday, June 13, 2015
1:00–4:30 p.m.
Getty Center, Boardroom
Course fee $65 (includes parking)

Enjoy the perfect pairing of art and wine from northern Italy with curator Bryan Keene and certified sommelier and cicerone Mark Mark Botieff. Participants tour the exhibition Renaissance Splendors of the Northern Italian Court, explore art history and wine production, and savor delectable wines from the Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy, and Veneto regions.


Experiencing the Getty Center
The Getty Center


Novice and seasoned museumgoers are invited to fully experience works of art in the Museum's collection. Educators direct discussion and the study of select masterpieces. Each course includes up to four thematically linked sessions, which take place once a month, usually on a Saturday morning. Attend a single class or the whole series.

 
Recently in the series
The Anatomy of Greatness: Michelangelo's Sculptures

Saturday, September 21, 2013
1:00–4:00 p.m.
Getty Center, Getty Research Institute Lecture Hall

Dr. Robert Klapper, chief of orthopedic surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Group, is a surgeon and sculptor who travels to Carrara, Italy, every summer to work on the same type of stone Michelangelo used to carve the masterpieces David and the Pietà. Join Dr. Klapper and art historian Robin Trento in this lecture and gallery tour exploring the ways in which Michelangelo and others use human anatomy to depict emotion. Course fee $35 (includes parking).

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Experiencing the Getty Villa
The Getty Villa


Enjoy an afternoon at the Getty Villa exploring the antiquities collection, gardens, and ancient architecture. Course fee varies.


 
Recently in the series
Classical Monsters, Hybrids, and Bizarre Beings

Saturday, May 9, 2015
1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Meeting Rooms and
Museum galleries
Course fee $35 (includes parking and refreshments)

Strange and dangerous creatures abound in Greco-Roman mythology, many sporting excess body parts or joined together from different beings. Some were born, others mutated by enraged gods. Explore with educator Shelby Brown the fascinating stories and imagery of these bizarre beings, then tour the galleries to compare normal with abnormal.

 


Recently in the series
Stories for the Greek Dead

Sunday, April 12, 2015
1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Meeting Rooms and
Museum galleries
Course fee $35 (includes parking and refreshments)

Delve into Greek and related south Italian tales of dramatic death and examine myths considered appropriate for the dead with educator Eric Bruehl. Tour the Museum collection and the exhibition Dangerous Perfection: Funerary Vases from Southern Italy to learn how artists approach scenes of death and to view the narratives decorating spectacular funerary urns.

Pudgy or pregnant lap dog
 
Pets and Prey: Animals in Greco-Roman Antiquity

Saturday, March 21, 2015
1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Meeting Rooms and
Museum galleries

Explore the Greeks' and Romans' relationship with animals, from beloved domestic pets to exotic predators and prey, with educator Shelby Brown. Learn about the many animal disguises assumed by gods in their pursuit of mortal women. Then tour the Museum to discover how animals were immortalized in varied media in both funerary and domestic art. Course fee $35 (includes refreshments).

Zeus, Disguised as a Swan
 
Love Stories in Greece and Rome
Saturday, February 14, 2015
1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Meeting Rooms and
Museum galleries

Celebrate Valentine's Day with a visit to the beautiful Getty Villa to explore love in antiquity with educator Shelby Brown. Learn famous love stories and explore the moments artists choose to depict. Take tips from divine seducers and contemplate the powers of love charms. End with a tour of love imagery in the galleries. Course fee $35 per session (includes refreshments). Complimentary parking.



 
Stories for the Roman Dead
Saturday, January 24, 2015
1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Meeting Rooms and
Museum galleries

Roman stone sarcophagi ("flesh-eaters" in ancient Greek) were coffins decorated with elaborate narratives of daily life and myth. Explore Roman burial customs and imagery with educator Eric Bruehl to compare funerary stories that still make sense today with others that reveal how different the Romans really were. Then tour the galleries to examine funerary reliefs.