Artist Sylvana Barrett demonstrates the art of gilding at a past artist-at-work demonstration
Learn about historic and contemporary materials and techniques from practicing artists in these free drop-in programs.

Artist at Work
The Getty Center and The Getty Villa


Enjoy presentations of historical art-making techniques related to the Museum's collection and exhibitions. Meet artists, ask questions, and get close to the action. This is a free, drop-in program.

Next in the series

 
Paper and Light
Sunday, October 2, 9, 30, and
November 13, 2016
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Getty Center, Plaza Courtyard

Drop by as photographer Luther Gerlach explores the art and science behind early paper photography and demonstrates a variety of authentic 19th-century cameras, lenses, and other equipment, including an interactive camera obscura. Complements the Real/Ideal: photography in France, 1847-1860 and Richard Learoyd: In Studio exhibitions. This is a free, drop-in program.








 
All that Glitters is Gold (or is it?)
Friday, October 28, 2016
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Getty Center, Museum Studios A & B

Join renowned book artist Daniel Kelm in an exploration of the use of gold and its glittery cousins in Medieval manuscripts. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of chemistry and alchemy, Kelm investigates the philosophical underpinnings of alchemy and how gold relates to the Humors and other alchemical concepts as he demonstrates techniques for working with gold, including gold leaf on paper and leather and making powdered gold for paint. Complements the exhibitions The Alchemy of Color in Medieval Manuscripts and The Art of Alchemy.


 
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Mosaicist Jim Bachor
Saturday, July 9
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and 4:00–5:00 p.m.
Sunday, July 10
11:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. and 2:00–3:00 p.m. Getty Villa, Education Court

Jim Bachor demonstrates the tools, materials, and processes he uses to create contemporary mosaics in his studio and on the streets of Chicago. He discusses the aesthetic and practical challenges of creating mosaics from antiquity through today. A hands-on collaborative activity follows the demonstration. Complements the exhibition Roman Mosaics across the Empire. This is a free, drop-in program.


 
Illuminating the Medieval World
Sundays, April 3, May 1, 15, 29 and June 12 & 26, 2016
Getty Center, Museum Studios
1:00–3:00 p.m.

Medieval trade routes facilitated an exchange of luxury goods across Asia, Europe and Northern Africa providing artists with both inspiration and exotic raw materials for making pigments, such as indigo, lapis, and eventually cochineal from the Americas. Join artist Sylvana Barrett for an exploration of these precious materials and a demonstration of their use in the illumination of manuscripts. This is a free, drop-in program.



 
Tapestry Weaving
Getty Center
1:00–3:00 p.m.

Colorful and glittering tapestries, handwoven after designs by the most renowned artists, were the ultimate expression of power, taste, and wealth during the reign of Louis XIV. Join tapestry conservator and weaver Yadin Larochette in an exploration of the materials and techniques used to produce the monumental tapestries featured in the Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV exhibition. This is a free, drop-in program.

In Gallery
Experience a live weaving demonstration by Yadin Larochette in the special exhibition galleries while viewing the extraordinary tapestries of Louis XIV.
Tuesdays: January 5, 12, 19, February 2, 9, 16 and March 1, 15, 29, 2016
Special Exhibition Pavilion

In Studio
Join Yadin Larochette for an interactive introduction to the materials and techniques used to create beautiful, handwoven tapestries from the initial design to the final stages of manufacture.
Sundays: January 17, February 7, 28 and March 20, 2016
Museum Studios


 
Artist at Work: Daguerreotypes
Sundays, November 15 - December 6, 2015
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Getty Center, Museum Studios

Drop by as photographer Luther Gerlach demonstrates the materials and techniques used to make daguerreotypes, the earliest form of photography, invented by Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre. Daguerreotypes were a wildly popular medium for portraiture into the mid-1850s. Complements the exhibition In Focus: Daguerreotypes.

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Artist Projects
The Getty Center and The Getty Villa


 
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taisha paggett & Yann Novak: Mountain, Fire, Holding Still.
Saturday, August 27, 2016
10:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Outer Peristyle

Los Angeles-based dance artist taisha paggett and sound artist Yann Novak consider blackness in antiquity as it relates to the body through an immersive and durational performance. This is a free, day-long program. Advanced ticket to the Getty Villa required.

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Getty Artists Program
The Getty Center


The Getty Artists Program extends the education department's existing artist-based programs to include individual artist projects or residencies. Invitations are extended to artists who have shown a strong interest in education. One artist is selected each year and given the freedom to select an audience to work with, and to develop focus and format of their own project.

One goal of the program is to provide invited artists with the opportunity to undertake innovative projects in collaboration with the Museum's staff. The projects provide Museum staff and visitors with new insights and perspectives into the Museum's collections and exhibitions. Thus, our existing audiences have new opportunities for unique learning experiences, and the program has the potential to bring in new audiences. Learn more about this program.

Next in the series

Barbara Kruger—Whose Values?, 2014

Barbara Kruger, the 2014 Getty Artists Program invitee, is internationally-renown for her large-scale and immersive image, text, and video installations that address provocative social, cultural, and political issues.

For her project, Whose Values?, Kruger joins forces with LAUSD Title I High Schools, specifically 11th and 12th graders from Grover Cleveland High School's Humanities Magnet and Academy of Art and Technology, as well as 12th graders from Chatsworth High School's Humanitas Academy of Education and Human Services. Working with Getty staff and educators from the participating schools, Kruger will engage in small and large-format discussions and activities supporting collaborative art and writing projects connected to core curricular themes of social justice, identity, race, gender and advocacy.

"The Getty Artists Program is an opportunity for me to encourage students to try to visualize, musicalize, and textualize their experience in the world," says Kruger. "I know that this creation of commentary can change lives, encourage ambition, and suggest the pleasure of learning."

The project kicks off in November when Kruger speaks to participating students at Grover Cleveland High School, and will continue in 2015 with a culminating event in the spring.

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Point of View: Artist Talks
The Getty Center and The Getty Villa


Point of View: Artist Talks feature Los Angeles-based artists and related specialists in an informal and intimate gallery-talk program, offering a unique perspective on the Getty collection and temporary exhibitions. Free; offered on selected Thursday or Saturday afternoons.

 
Recently in the series

Point of View Tour: Ancient Music with Roberto Catalano
Saturdays, March 5 and March 12, April 3, May 8 and 22, 2016
11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:00-3:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Museum Galleries

Musicians and instruments were popular subjects for ancient Greek painters and sculptors. Join musician and ethnomusicologist Roberto Catalano, of Musicàntica, for an interactive gallery tour featuring instruments such as the aulos, krotalas, kimbala, and lyre. Through live demonstration, learn how these instruments were made and played and how they relate to modern Mediterranean folk instruments. This is a free program. Open to 25 participants. Sign-up begins 15 minutes before the program at the Tour Meeting Place.




 
Point of View: Artist Talk
Thursday, October 8, 2015
1:30 p.m.
Getty Center, Center for Photographs

Join photographers Sawada Tomoko and Shiga Lieko, whose work appears in the exhibition The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography, to learn about their processes of creating photographic series. Sawada talks about the difficult personal transformation she underwent to generate the self-portraits that appear in her project OMIAI♡, while Shiga recounts how the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami impacted the development of her mesmerizing series Rasen Kaigan.

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