Rasha Kamel, a chemist with Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), arrived at the GCI in July 2010 for a three-week visit to conduct research related to the GCI-SCA joint project on the Conservation and Management of the Tomb of Tutankhamen. Kamel brought with her samples taken from Tutankhamen's tomb, which were examined by Kamel and GCI scientists using a variety of investigative techniques.

At the beginning of 2011, Roy Berns, director of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory at the Rochester Institute of Technology, spent six weeks at the GCI working with GCI Senior Scientist Jim Druzik and members of his research group. While at the GCI, Berns explored future possibilities of using multispectral imaging to augment microfading to produce accurate color images based upon the spectral and colorimetric information derived from microfadin, with the goal of producing a visual record of the numerical data to aid curators and conservators.

Berns also provided insights into statistical approaches with colorimetric data for anoxic light exposure test results and for investigation of the light sensitivity of anthropological, fine-art, and natural history artifacts composed in part, or totally, of feathers—a component of the GCI's Museum Lighting project.