Longue Vue House and Gardens
 

The Getty Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the J. Paul Getty Trust, has launched a special initiative to assist New Orleans visual arts institutions to recover from the impact of Hurricane Katrina—the Fund for New Orleans, a $2 million fund to aid the city's visual arts organizations.

The Getty Foundation's Fund for New Orleans will enable nonprofit arts organizations to apply for support in two areas: conservation and transition planning. Conservation grants are designed to assist the city's cultural institutions to care for their art collections and archives, historic buildings, and landscapes. Transition planning grants are aimed at strengthening nonprofits as they respond to the changed environment for the arts following the storm.

The existence of New Orleans, as well as the city's cultural economy, were threatened by the hurricane. The Fund for New Orleans recognizes that increasing cultural tourism is an important part of the recovery effort.

Shortly after the storm, the Getty Foundation funded the launch of the National Trust for Historic Preservation's recovery and outreach efforts in the devastated region (see Conservation, vol. 20, no. 3). The grant covered the expenses necessary to organize and deploy volunteer teams of architects, conservators, and engineers to Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, to assess the damage caused to historic buildings and districts by the storm and flooding. This work served as an essential first step in preserving and rebuilding the area's towns and neighborhoods.

The Getty Foundation's Fund for New Orleans reaffirms its commitment to philanthropy in New Orleans. While this special fund has been designed to provide concentrated assistance in New Orleans, the Foundation will also consider support through its regular grant categories for other organizations in the region that were impacted by Hurricane Katrina. In addition to the grant fund, Getty staff members will lend their expertise to selected conservation or transition planning projects.