Course Announcement: Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites with Mosaics


In Situ Mosaics
 

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The second group of activities focuses on the conservation of mosaics in situ and the building of the capacity of personnel charged with their care and management.

Caring for archaeological mosaics in situ requires expertise at a number of different levels. For this reason, MOSAIKON is developing training tailored to the needs of the different types of personnel who play a role in safeguarding mosaics. This training includes:

 

Technician Training
For technicians, the project will carry out relatively long-term courses on the conservation and maintenance of mosaic pavements in situ. The curriculum for the in situ training will be drawn from similar courses previously organized by the GCI and the INP in Tunisia, as well as by other entities in the region. Reflecting on prior experience, the training courses will include a series of modules with intervening periods of supervised work at the sites where the trainees are normally based. The training courses will extend eighteen months to two years. Each course will be followed by an additional year of mentoring at the trainees' sites. Participants will be drawn from different countries of each sub-region for each of the courses—initially Africa, then subsequently the Middle East.

The first MOSAIKON workshop for technicians responsible for the care of in situ archaeological mosaics will begin in spring 2011 in Tunisia and include conservation technicians from a number of North African countries.

Lead partner: The Getty Conservation Institute

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Site Management Training

Three sub-regional courses entitled Conservation and Management of Mosaics on Archaeological Sites will be offered for site managers in a number of venues over a five-year period. This course addresses mosaics conservation in the context of broader site management issues such as visitation, urban encroachment, development pressures, and presentation. Each course consists of two parts: a three-week workshop, which takes place at an archaeological site, and a period of practical work that participants pursue at their own sites. During the practical work phase of the course, participants remain in regular contact with instructors who provide advice and assistance as warranted. The mentoring provided during the practical work assures that participants have the support they need as they apply their developing skills to their own sites.

The curriculum for Conservation and Management of Mosaics on Archaeological Sites is drawn from similar courses previously carried out by the GCI and ICCROM. Participants are site managers, conservators, archaeologists, architects, and related cultural heritage professionals from a number of countries in each sub-region.

The first Conservation and Management of Mosaics on Archaeological Sites took place May 3-21, 2010, at the site of Tyre, Lebanon, in partnership with the Directorate General of Antiquities of the Ministry of Culture of Lebanon. The course was intended for site managers from the Arab countries of the eastern Mediterranean and North Africa, and was taught in both Arabic and English. Fifteen participants from Algeria, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria, and Tunisia took part in the three-week workshop. Together with an international group of instructors, the participants considered the significance of mosaics on archaeological sites and strategies for their management and conservation. With a combination of lectures, classroom activities and discussion, and on-site practical exercises, the workshop curriculum included mosaic typology, techniques, and terminology; site management; documentation and condition assessment; materials deterioration; and hands-on conservation practice.

The practical work phase of the course began in June 2010 and extends until January 31, 2011. At their own sites, participants are carrying out individual or small group projects that draw upon topics covered by the course, guided by course instructors. In early 2011 participants and instructors will reconvene for a follow-up meeting where work progress will be reviewed and discussed.

Core instructors for the first Conservation and Management of Mosaics on Archaeological Sites course:

  • Aicha Ben Abed, Regional Coordinator for MOSAIKON, Tunisia
  • Zaki Aslan, ICCROM, Italy
  • Martha Demas, Getty Conservation Institute, United States
  • Alaa el Habashi, Turath Conservation Group, Egypt
  • Gionata Rizzi, Studio Rizzi, Italy
  • Tom Roby, Getty Conservation Institute, United States
  • Isabelle Skaf, Conservation SARL, Lebanon
  • John Stewart, English Heritage, England

Participants in the first Conservation and Management of Mosaics on Archaeological Sites:

  • Carole Atallah, Archaeologist, Directorate General of Antiquities, Lebanon
  • Magdy Badawy, Conservator, Supreme Council of Antiquities, Egypt
  • Lotfi Belhouchet, Archaeologist, Institut National du Patrimoine, Tunisia
  • Abdelmadjid Belkares, Archaeologist, Office de Gestion et d'exploitation des biens Culturels Protégé, Algeria
  • Nesreen Bouza, Architect, Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums, Syria
  • Rachid Bouzidi, Archaeologist, site of Volubilis, Morocco
  • Shaimaa Elsheshtawy, Archaeologist, Supreme Council of Antiquities, Egypt
  • Alaa Hammoud, Architect, Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums, Syria
  • Badr Jabbour Gedeon, Conservator/Restorer, Conservation SARL, Lebanon
  • Maher Jbaee, Conservator/Restorer, Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums, Syria
  • Samar Karam, Archaeologist, Directorate General of Antiquities, Lebanon
  • Amira al-Khousht, Archaeologist, Supreme Council of Antiquities, Egypt
  • Hicham Rguig, Archaeologist, Direction du Patrimoine Culturel, Ministère de la Culture, Morocco
  • Mohannad al Taweel, Conservator/Restorer, Directorate General of Antiquities and Museums, Syria
  • Myriam Ziade, Archaeologist, Directorate General of Antiquities, Lebanon

Lead partners: The Getty Conservation Institute and ICCROM (ATHAR Program)

Last updated: August 2010